CNNMoney
Now playing
03:03
Inside ClassPass, the infamous all-gym membership
Now playing
02:55
Surgeon general issues warning about sharing health information on social media
CNN
Now playing
04:18
Cooper: Ignoring Trump, as tempting as it may be, isn't option
A person uses Windows software
Shutterstock
A person uses Windows software
Now playing
00:53
Microsoft urges Windows users to install update
Staff enter the headquarters of information technology firm Kaseya in Miami, Florida, U.S., in an undated still image from video. Kaseya/Handout via REUTERS NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
Kaseya via Reuters
Staff enter the headquarters of information technology firm Kaseya in Miami, Florida, U.S., in an undated still image from video. Kaseya/Handout via REUTERS NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
Now playing
01:41
Kaseya: The massive ransomware attack compromised up to 1,500 businesses
Getty Images
Now playing
02:43
Websites and apps go down during massive outage
Messaging in iOS 15.
Apple
Messaging in iOS 15.
Now playing
01:34
FaceTime. IDs. Do Not Disturb. See Apple's latest updates
Clockwork
Now playing
02:20
Robot manicure really 'nails it'
Avengers Campus at Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim, California, invites guests of all ages into a new land where they can sling webs on the first Disney ride-through attraction to feature Spider-Man. The immersive land also presents multiple heroic encounters with Avengers and their allies, like Iron Man, Black Panther, Black Widow and more. At Pym Test Kitchen, food scientists will utilize Ant-Man and The WaspÕs shrinking and growing technology to serve up perfectly sized snacks. (Christian Thompson/Disneyland Resort)
DISNEY
Avengers Campus at Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim, California, invites guests of all ages into a new land where they can sling webs on the first Disney ride-through attraction to feature Spider-Man. The immersive land also presents multiple heroic encounters with Avengers and their allies, like Iron Man, Black Panther, Black Widow and more. At Pym Test Kitchen, food scientists will utilize Ant-Man and The WaspÕs shrinking and growing technology to serve up perfectly sized snacks. (Christian Thompson/Disneyland Resort)
Now playing
01:46
Disney unveils one of its most innovative attractions
Now playing
05:37
Novogratz: Sports will make NFTs broadly accessible
Courtesy AirlingRatings.com
Now playing
02:45
Delta Air Lines prepares 'connected cabins' for post-pandemic flights
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, center, gives his opening remarks flanked by local state delegation members prior to signing legislation that seeks to punish social media platforms that remove conservative ideas from their sites, inside Florida International University's MARC building in Miami on Monday, May 24, 2021. (Carl Juste/Miami Herald via AP)
Carl Juste/Miami Herald/AP
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, center, gives his opening remarks flanked by local state delegation members prior to signing legislation that seeks to punish social media platforms that remove conservative ideas from their sites, inside Florida International University's MARC building in Miami on Monday, May 24, 2021. (Carl Juste/Miami Herald via AP)
Now playing
01:07
Florida governor signs bill targeting social media platforms
Now playing
03:03
This company is making drone delivery a reality
Now playing
05:21
Inside the logistics system behind Alibaba
YouTube/Joel Johnson
Now playing
01:46
Watch self-driving car struggle to understand traffic cones
Boston-based REGENT's "seaglider" is a mix between a boat and an aircraft with a top speed of 180 mph.
REGENT
Boston-based REGENT's "seaglider" is a mix between a boat and an aircraft with a top speed of 180 mph.
Now playing
01:00
It's a boat? It's a plane? No, it's a 'seaglider.' And it goes fast...really fast
San Francisco CNN Business —  

Peloton’s ride just got a little bumpier.

The boutique fitness brand is now facing a $150 million lawsuit over alleged copyright violations for its use of over 1,000 songs in its workout videos.

“We just received the complaint yesterday, and we are evaluating it,” a Peloton spokesperson told CNN Business in a statement. “Peloton has great respect for songwriters and artists. In fact, we have partnered with each of the major music publishers, record labels and performing rights organizations, and many leading independents.”

The spokesperson also said the company has “invested heavily” in a reporting and licensing system that helps support its partnerships.

The lawsuit is being brought by members of the National Music Publishers’ Association, including Downtown Music Publishing and Big Deal Music, over the use of songs by artists such as Rihanna, Bruno Mars, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry and Justin Timberlake.

The suit notes that Peloton has licensed with some parties in the music publishing industry but not all, which means according to the suit that there are songwriters who are losing money. It also claims that Peloton is a “willful infringer” of copyrights.

“There is no doubt that Peloton’s infringement was and continues to be knowing and reckless,” the suit says. “Peloton fully understood what the copyright law required, having entered into sync licenses with certain other copyright holders, while trampling the rights of Plaintiffs by using their musical works for free and without permission.”

Synchronization licenses, or sync licenses, are agreements that allow someone to use a song in a video format.

Peloton sells pricey in-home stationary bikes and treadmills and offers a subscription-based membership that gives people access to streamed classes. The workout videos feature a variety of well-known songs that sometimes follow a theme, like 80s hits or the best of Beyoncé. The classes, which people can join live or on demand, are filmed in Peloton’s studio in NYC, which requires an additional membership.

“Why wouldn’t they just use the music they have licenses for?” said Jeff Peretz, a professor of music theory and performance at New York University and an expert in music copyright. “I think they just misunderstood the reality.”

Peretz told CNN Business that Peloton might have thought it was covered with the type of license that allows places like bars and gyms to play music. However, he said once Peloton used the songs in streamed videos, a different license would be required.

“Peloton is saying they’re striking deals with publishers,” he said. “If they start making money off these videos then the money is not all theirs. It’s copyrighted intellectual property.”

Peloton did not respond to a request for further comment.

The company was founded in 2012 and is expected to go public this year. The complaint notes that it has a reported valuation of over $4 billion.