01:44 - Source: CNN
On GPS: The future of India-Pakistan relations
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Pakistan will go after the assets and bank accounts of militant groups within its borders and in Pakistani-controlled Kashmir, according to a statement on its Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

The freezing and seizure order complies with the UN Security Council requirement that member states target the assets of entities and individuals listed by the sanctions committee.

The UNSC has the right “to decide measures… to give effect to its decisions for the maintenance of international peace and security,” the statement acknowledges.

Indian Muslims hold a scratched photo of Jaish-e-Mohammad group chief, Maulana Masood Azhar, as they shout slogans against Pakistan during a protest in Mumbai.
INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Indian Muslims hold a scratched photo of Jaish-e-Mohammad group chief, Maulana Masood Azhar, as they shout slogans against Pakistan during a protest in Mumbai.

The move comes just weeks after a Pakistan-based militant group, Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM), claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing in Pulwama in Indian-controlled Kashmir on February 14, which resulted in the deaths of 40 Indian troops.

The US and the UNSC designated JeM, which formed almost two decades ago and has been recently resurgent, as a terrorist organization in 2001.

02:03 - Source: CNN
How the latest Kashmir crisis happened

The February attack prompted retaliatory measures by India, who said last week that it had struck a JeM camp within Pakistan.

Escalations

Pakistan disputes this – Islamabad’s ambassador to the US, Asad Majeed Khan, called the claim “ridiculous” in remarks Monday night – but acknowledges that Indian jets had dropped payload within its borders.

In retaliation, Pakistan claimed its air force had shot down two Indian fighter jets, capturing one pilot. India said just one plane was downed.

The captured airman, Indian Air Force Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman was returned to India Friday, in what Pakistan called a “peace gesture.”

’Return from the brink’

Despite the conciliatory gesture and efforts from the Pakistan government to reduce tensions, the situation remains “serious,” according to Khan.

The return of Varthaman, however, had allowed the two countries to return “from the brink, at least for now,” he said at the US Institute of Peace in Washington, DC on Monday.

“We hope that the worst is behind us and that some sense and sanity would prevail in India allowing to the present government to see the current escalation with Pakistan beyond their narrow, political, domestic considerations and the serious threats it posed to peace and security in the region and beyond,” the ambassador said.

Within the speech, however, he maintained some criticism of his country’s nuclear-armed neighbor.

“It is a matter of concern that the frenzy that the Indian government whipped up around the attack has resulted in poor Kashmiris being attacked and hounded across India,” he said, saying the Kashmiris have suffered “unspeakable atrocities” over the years.