US President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, October 25, 2017, as he travels to Dallas, Texas. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, October 25, 2017, as he travels to Dallas, Texas. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:17
Trump team's about-face on Paul Manafort
Chairman Joe Manchin (C), D-WV, greets Congresswoman Deb Haaland, D-NM, during the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources hearing on her nomination to be Interior Secretary on February 23, 2021 in Washington, DC. If confirmed, Haaland would become the first Native American Cabinet secretary in U.S. history.
PHOTO: Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images
Chairman Joe Manchin (C), D-WV, greets Congresswoman Deb Haaland, D-NM, during the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources hearing on her nomination to be Interior Secretary on February 23, 2021 in Washington, DC. If confirmed, Haaland would become the first Native American Cabinet secretary in U.S. history.
Now playing
02:06
Democratic senator slows progress on Biden's Covid-19 bill
John King Magic Wall 0305
PHOTO: CNN
John King Magic Wall 0305
Now playing
02:17
President Biden sending a team to the US-Mexico border
Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner  attends a press conference on September 4, 2020, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner attends a press conference on September 4, 2020, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:50
Jared Kushner disappears from Trump's inner circle
Rep john garamendi 0305
PHOTO: CNN
Rep john garamendi 0305
Now playing
02:33
Rep. Garamendi: Any lawmaker involved in Capitol riots ought to be thrown out of Congress
Protesters gather at Lincoln Park to demand the Emancipation Memorial be taken down on June 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Protesters gather at Lincoln Park to demand the Emancipation Memorial be taken down on June 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
03:01
Why some people want this Abraham Lincoln statue taken down
psaki
PHOTO: CNN
psaki
Now playing
00:56
Psaki fires back at Trump testing czar over vaccine claims
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:04
Avlon: Pence's op-ed is 'way worse than Stockholm syndrome'
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:35
See what security looks like outside US Capitol
PHOTO: Gov. Cuomo's office
Now playing
03:35
Gov. Andrew Cuomo addresses women's allegations
Cuomo
PHOTO: Gov. Cuomo's Office
Cuomo
Now playing
00:56
Cuomo says he has no plans to resign
Now playing
04:51
Elected Republican who supports Biden's bill speaks out
President Joe Biden speaks during a meeting about cancer in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, March 3, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
PHOTO: Alex Brandon/AP
President Joe Biden speaks during a meeting about cancer in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, March 3, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Now playing
01:20
'Neanderthal thinking': Biden on states lifting mask restrictions
PHOTO: CNN/Getty
Now playing
02:10
'Highly misleading at best': Dale reacts to Pence's op-ed
Commanding General District of Columbia National Guard Major General William J. Walker testifies before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs/Rules and Administration hearing to examine the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol on Capitol Hill on March 3, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Greg Nash / POOL / AFP) (Photo by GREG NASH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: GREG NASH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
Commanding General District of Columbia National Guard Major General William J. Walker testifies before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs/Rules and Administration hearing to examine the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol on Capitol Hill on March 3, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Greg Nash / POOL / AFP) (Photo by GREG NASH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
03:01
DC National Guard commander: 'Unusual' Pentagon restrictions slowed response to Capitol riot
FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the January 6th insurrection, in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on March 2, 2021. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / POOL / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the January 6th insurrection, in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on March 2, 2021. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / POOL / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:55
Watch FBI director debunk conspiracy theories pushed by Trump supporters
(CNN) —  

Prosecutors from special counsel Robert Mueller’s office wrote in a sentencing memo filed Friday for Paul Manafort that the former Trump campaign chairman’s years of criminality were “bold” and continued even when and after he served as Donald Trump’s campaign chair in the 2016 election.

The memo was made public Saturday with some redactions, and prosecutors asked Judge Amy Berman Jackson to make sure the now-jailed 69-year-old may never walk free again.

Manafort pleaded guilty in September to conspiracy against the US and conspiracy witness tampering. At the time of his plea, Manafort also admitted to a litany of money laundering and foreign lobbying crimes that encompassed his work for Ukrainian politicians and other clients over several years.

The prosecutors specifically note that they don’t believe Manafort accepted responsibility for his crimes, and there’s no reason his agreement to plead guilty and cooperate should help him at sentencing. Even after he broke the plea deal, there was some question about whether Manafort had accepted responsibility in the eyes of the court and the prosecutors because of his admissions to so many crimes.

The special counsel’s office wrote that “Manafort’s conduct after he pleaded guilty is pertinent to sentencing. It reflects a hardened adherence to committing crimes and lack of remorse.”

The prosecutors did not give a specific amount of time for which they’d like Berman Jackson to sentence Manafort to prison, though they reminded her that she can impose a sentence that runs in addition to the time Manafort gets from another federal judge in Virginia for financial fraud.

He’ll be sentenced in Virginia first, and prosecutors have told that judge he should face up to 25 years in prison. He will only be sentenced for two crimes in the DC District Court, which together are capped at 10 years. However, prosecutors have also outlined a host of other crimes for which he is not charged — including perjury after he pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate last September. They suggest he may be able to face a sentence in DC above the cap of 10 years.

In the redacted sentencing document released Saturday, prosecutors documented the range of people Manafort deceived, including “Members of Congress, and members of the executive branch of the United States government” with his illegal lobbying.

The sentencing memorandum is the last major requisite court filing in Mueller’s longest running case, a sprawling prosecution of Manafort that led investigators to gather exhaustive information about his hidden Cypriot bank accounts, Ukrainian political efforts in Europe and the US, and into Manafort’s time on the 2016 presidential campaign.

The prosecutors did not reveal on Saturday new information about Manafort’s activities in 2016 and later, which prosecutors say have become a focus of Mueller’s inquiry into Russian influence and the Trump campaign.

This story has been updated.