Now playing
02:49
Woman tells CNN reporter: My baby is dead
TOPSHOT - Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (C) attempts to cut a cake with a sword, lent to her by The Lord-Lieutenant of Cornwall, Edward Bolitho, to celebrate of The Big Lunch initiative at The Eden Project, near St Austell in south west England on June 11, 2021. (Photo by Oli SCARFF / POOL / AFP) (Photo by OLI SCARFF/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Oli Scarff/AFP/Pool/Getty Images
TOPSHOT - Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (C) attempts to cut a cake with a sword, lent to her by The Lord-Lieutenant of Cornwall, Edward Bolitho, to celebrate of The Big Lunch initiative at The Eden Project, near St Austell in south west England on June 11, 2021. (Photo by Oli SCARFF / POOL / AFP) (Photo by OLI SCARFF/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
00:54
Watch the Queen cut a cake with a sword
Vladimir Putin NBC intv
NBC
Vladimir Putin NBC intv
Now playing
04:22
Hear how Putin compared Donald Trump to Joe Biden
cctv
Now playing
01:02
China makes new Great Wall discovery
peskov
CNN
peskov
Now playing
02:34
Kremlin spokesman speaks on state of US-Russia relations
Now playing
04:00
At least 7 Nicaraguan opposition leaders detained ahead of election
US President Joe Biden, Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Italy's Prime minister Mario Draghi, President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Council Charles Michel, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel, France's President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson sit around the table at the start of the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall on June 11, 2021.
LEON NEAL/AFP/POOL/Getty Images
US President Joe Biden, Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Italy's Prime minister Mario Draghi, President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Council Charles Michel, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel, France's President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson sit around the table at the start of the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall on June 11, 2021.
Now playing
01:27
What is the G7?
screengrab china elephants
CCTV
screengrab china elephants
Now playing
03:06
Elephant migration may reveal serious problem for China
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson (R) speaks with US President Joe Biden while they walk at Carbis Bay, Cornwall on June 10, 2021, ahead of the three-day G7 summit being held from 11-13 June. - G7 leaders from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the UK and the United States meet this weekend for the first time in nearly two years, for the three-day talks in Carbis Bay, Cornwall. - (Photo by TOBY MELVILLE / POOL / AFP) (Photo by TOBY MELVILLE/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
TOBY MELVILLE/AFP/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson (R) speaks with US President Joe Biden while they walk at Carbis Bay, Cornwall on June 10, 2021, ahead of the three-day G7 summit being held from 11-13 June. - G7 leaders from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the UK and the United States meet this weekend for the first time in nearly two years, for the three-day talks in Carbis Bay, Cornwall. - (Photo by TOBY MELVILLE / POOL / AFP) (Photo by TOBY MELVILLE/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:58
See Boris Johnson's reaction to Biden's joke about their wives
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and US First Lady Jill Biden visit Connor Downs Academy in Hayle, Cornwall on the sidelines of the G7 summit on June 11, 2021. (Photo by DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / various sources / AFP) (Photo by DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP via Getty Images)
Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and US First Lady Jill Biden visit Connor Downs Academy in Hayle, Cornwall on the sidelines of the G7 summit on June 11, 2021. (Photo by DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / various sources / AFP) (Photo by DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:26
See Jill Biden and the Duchess of Cambridge host school roundtable
In this photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un claps his hands at the ruling party congress in Pyongyang, North Korean, Sunday, Jan. 10, 2021. Kim was given a new title, "general secretary" of the ruling Workers' Party, formerly held by his late father and grandfather, state media reported Monday, Jan. 11, in what appears to a symbolic move aimed at bolstering his authority amid growing economic challenges. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. The content of this image is as provided and cannot be independently verified. Korean language watermark on image as provided by source reads: "KCNA" which is the abbreviation for Korean Central News Agency. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)
KCNA/AP
In this photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un claps his hands at the ruling party congress in Pyongyang, North Korean, Sunday, Jan. 10, 2021. Kim was given a new title, "general secretary" of the ruling Workers' Party, formerly held by his late father and grandfather, state media reported Monday, Jan. 11, in what appears to a symbolic move aimed at bolstering his authority amid growing economic challenges. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. The content of this image is as provided and cannot be independently verified. Korean language watermark on image as provided by source reads: "KCNA" which is the abbreviation for Korean Central News Agency. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)
Now playing
02:23
How Kim Jong Un's weight could have geopolitical consequences
Getty Images/Sputnik/AFP
Now playing
02:23
Putin sends message ahead of Biden meeting
CNN
Now playing
04:46
These boys are leaving their home for the US. There's a good reason why
screengrab taiwan drought
Reuters
screengrab taiwan drought
Now playing
02:55
How island's historic drought could threaten the global economy
A drone photo of the destroyed building housing the offices of The Associated Press and other media, after it was hit last week by Israeli airstrikes, in Gaza City, Saturday, May 22, 2021.(AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Khalil Hamra/AP
A drone photo of the destroyed building housing the offices of The Associated Press and other media, after it was hit last week by Israeli airstrikes, in Gaza City, Saturday, May 22, 2021.(AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Now playing
03:26
Israel says AP building destroyed in Gaza hosted anti-Iron Dome research
Now playing
02:09
France is sending a second 'Statue of Liberty' to the US
CNN —  

Venezuela will send food to feed hungry Colombian children, communications minister Jorge Rodriguez claimed Monday – citing statistics about poverty in neighboring Colombia – even as citizens in his country struggle with food shortages at home.

Rodriguez said in a televised statement that more than 20,000 boxes of food aid would be sent to the Colombian border city Cucuta, in an apparent retort to international efforts to send food to hungry Venezuelans.

Cucuta has gained international prominence as a collection point for foreign shipments of humanitarian aid to Venezuela, which have so far been rejected by the Maduro regime. It is also a first stop for many fleeing Venezuela; many of the needy children living there are in fact Venezuelan.

Opposition leader Juan Guaido, who declared himself the country’s acting president in January, called on the international community to help feed Venezuela earlier this month.

The United States has already responded: On Saturday, the US Agency for International Development (USAID) deposited its second installment of supplies in Cucuta, including hygiene kits and nutrition products for children. So far, the aid is waiting in warehouses, and has not crossed into Venezuela.

According to an annual university study which closely monitors social conditions in Venezuela, almost 90% of citizens were living in poverty in 2017.

The study found that Venezuelans lost an average of 24 pounds – a result of what some describe as the “Maduro diet,” in reference to the rampant inflation and food scarcity that have swept the country under Maduro’s leadership. Maduro has argued that Guaido’s aid campaign is not needed, saying “We are not beggars.”

However, the country did accept aid before its current political crisis, with 9.2 million in food and health supplies approved by the United Nations as recently as November 2018.

Food and medicine aid for Venezuela is unloaded from a US Air Force C-17 aircraft at Camilo Daza International Airport in Cucuta, Colombia.
RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFPP/Getty Images
Food and medicine aid for Venezuela is unloaded from a US Air Force C-17 aircraft at Camilo Daza International Airport in Cucuta, Colombia.

While the Venezuelan opposition plans to introduce shipments of humanitarian aid to the country on February 23, it’s unclear how they will do it without the support of the military and police, who remain loyal to a defiant Maduro.

Several protests have broken out in the streets of the country since the crisis, calling on Maduro to let the humanitarian aid shipments into the economically crippled country.

The United Nations and International Red Cross have called on both sides in Venezuela to not politicize humanitarian aid.