University of Colorado Denver
Now playing
04:20
When seeing is no longer believing: Inside the Pentagon's race against deepfake videos
Now playing
03:37
IBM CEO: Every business is going to adopt AI
Boston-based REGENT's "seaglider" is a mix between a boat and an aircraft with a top speed of 180 mph.
REGENT
Boston-based REGENT's "seaglider" is a mix between a boat and an aircraft with a top speed of 180 mph.
Now playing
01:00
It's a boat? It's a plane? No, it's a 'seaglider.' And it goes fast...really fast
Now playing
02:50
Energy regulator: Pipelines are at the forefront of our national defenses
ORLANDO, FLORIDA - FEBRUARY 28:  Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. Begun in 1974, CPAC brings together conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders to discuss issues important to them. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
ORLANDO, FLORIDA - FEBRUARY 28: Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. Begun in 1974, CPAC brings together conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders to discuss issues important to them. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:32
CNN correspondent: This is a nightmare situation for Facebook
Now playing
04:11
Facebook decision 'is wait and see,' says former public policy director
Gravity Industries
Now playing
01:07
Watch these UK commandos fly over the sea with new jet pack
Congress hearing mishap
Twitter/The Hill
Congress hearing mishap
Now playing
03:39
From 'Galaxy Quest' to F-bombs: A year of video conference mishaps
Police used an image of the suspect taken from a fake driver's license left at the scene (left) to run a facial recognition scan. It returned a "high profile comparison" to Nijeer Parks (right). (Woodbridge Police Department)
Woodbridge Police Department
Police used an image of the suspect taken from a fake driver's license left at the scene (left) to run a facial recognition scan. It returned a "high profile comparison" to Nijeer Parks (right). (Woodbridge Police Department)
Now playing
06:33
He was innocent. But a facial recognition 'match' got this Black man arrested
Galaxy Book Pro 360 13 inches.
Samsung
Galaxy Book Pro 360 13 inches.
Now playing
01:39
Samsung's new laptops are almost smartphones
Now playing
01:37
Elon Musk taunts Jeff Bezos over NASA contract
Now playing
05:42
How NBA Top Shot turned dunks into digital gold
Now playing
03:09
Electronic skin could track your vital signs
AirTag
Apple
AirTag
Now playing
01:17
See AirTag, Apple's new device for tracking your lost stuff
Now playing
01:09
Google Earth's new Timelapse feature shows 40 years of climate change in just seconds
Now playing
05:41
NFTs have completely transformed these digital artists' lives
(CNN Business) —  

An increasing number of lawmakers are warning that a form of video manipulation, known as deepfakes, could be the next stage of information warfare ahead of the 2020 US Presidential election.

Deepfake video is hyper-realistic manipulated video made using artificial intelligence technology. Deepfakes can be so convincing it can be difficult to determine what has been manipulated and what has not.

The Department of Defense, through the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), has commissioned researchers across the United States to begin developing ways to detect when a video is a deepfake. CNN spoke to some of those working on the project for a special report published Monday.

Three members of the House of Representatives, including Rep. Adam Schiff, who now chairs the House Intelligence Committee, wrote to Director of National Intelligence Dan Coates in September expressing concern that deepfake “technology could soon be deployed by malicious foreign actors.”

Related: When seeing is no longer believing: Inside the Pentagon’s race against deepfake videos

“As deep fake technology becomes more advanced and more accessible, it could pose a threat to United States public discourse and national security, with broad and concerning implications for offensive active measures campaigns targeting the United States,” the lawmakers wrote.

Their concern comes after a Russian company with links to the Kremlin targeted the US with a widespread disinformation effort on social media in the lead-up to the 2016 Presidential election. That effort included fake Facebook pages and Twitter accounts. Lawmakers fear bad actors may use more sophisticated methods, including deepfakes, in the future.

The group asked Coates to prepare a report on deepfakes to be presented to Congress.

“During the 2016 election, my gravest fear was that the Russians would dump forged documents among the real, or worse still, add fake paragraphs into real emails. This is still a major concern for the 2020 election, as is the possibility of using deep fakes, and either would represent yet another dangerous escalation of cyber interference in our democracy,” Rep. Schiff said in a statement to CNN.

Senators, too, are sounding an alarm.

At a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing last May, Senator Marco Rubio, a Republican from Florida, said he believed deepfakes would be used in “the next wave of attacks against America and Western Democracies.”

Rubio described a scenario in which a fake video or piece of audio is dissemina