U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, gives a speech at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. Pompeo delivered a scathing rebuke of the Obama administration's Mideast policies as he denounced the former president for misguided and wishful thinking that diminished America's role in the region, harmed its longtime friends and emboldened its main foe: Iran. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
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U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, gives a speech at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. Pompeo delivered a scathing rebuke of the Obama administration's Mideast policies as he denounced the former president for misguided and wishful thinking that diminished America's role in the region, harmed its longtime friends and emboldened its main foe: Iran. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
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(CNN) —  

What a long, strange trip it has been. US Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, flew from the US to Jordan to Iraq to Egypt to the United Arab Emirates to Qatar to Saudi Arabia and finally to Oman.

It was intended to clarify the US position in the Middle East following President Trump’s surprise on December 19, when he tweeted a video announcing that he was pulling US forces out of Syria “now,” and to lay out the administration’s vision for the region.

But anyone hoping to hear the usual themes previous US leaders harped on about – the need to promote democracy and reform and human rights and resolving once and for all the Arab-Israeli conflict, must have been disappointed. Equally disappointed were those hoping that the US would press Saudi Arabia for clarity on who gave the order to murder and dismember The Washington Post columnist, Jamal Khashoggi.

Secretary Pompeo said he raised the Khashoggi murder when he met Monday with Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman in Riyadh.

“I think the Trump administration has made it clear that our expectation in all those involved in the murder of Khashoggi will be held accountable,” he told reporters after the meeting. “So we spent time talking about human rights issues, the Khashoggi case in particular.”

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo with Saudi Crown Price Mohammed bin Salman in Riyadh on Monday.
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo with Saudi Crown Price Mohammed bin Salman in Riyadh on Monday.

How much time they talked about that isn’t clear. Equally unclear is whether Pompeo raised the assessment of the Central Intelligence Agency that the Crown Prince ordered the murder of the Washington Post columnist in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last October, despite the Saudi government’s denials that the Crown Prince was involved.

In any event, that wasn’t the point of the trip. In addition to reassuring US allies over Syria, Pompeo made clear at The American University in Cairo in an address optimistically entitled “A Force for Good: America Reinvigorated in the Middle East,” that the US has two main priorities in the region: finishing the job of defeating ISIS, and stepping up the effort to contain what Washington sees as Iran’s growing influence in the region.

And it’s the second of these two priorities that clearly ranks highest.

The two most senior foreign policy officials in the Trump administration – Secretary of State Pompeo and National Security Advisor John Bolton – have long been hardliners on Iran. And remain so.

In 2016 Pompeo, then a congressman, wrote on Fox News’ website: “Congress must act to change Iranian behavior, and, ultimately, the Iranian regime.” Bolton, also an Iran regime change advocate, wrote an editorial in The New York Times entitled “To stop Iran’s bomb, bomb Iran.”

The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday that after pro-Iranian militias fired mortar shells on the diplomatic compound in Baghdad last September, and a similar incident several days later close to the US consulate in Basra, Bolton asked the Pentagon to provide options for a military strike on Iran.

Pompeo and Bolton insist that now, as members of the Trump administration, their job is to implement the policies of the President of the United States. For now, the policy toward Iran, as Pompeo laid it out in Cairo, is to use economic and political pressure “until Iran starts behaving like a normal country.”

Friend and foe alike might be excused if they are occasionally confused by the policy pursued by this administration. Earlier this month at a cabinet meeting President Trump declared Iranian leaders “can do what they want” in Syria after a US withdrawal. That went contrary to Bolton’s determination that US troops in Syria should remain “as long as Iranian troops are outside Iranian borders.” The president clearly didn’t buy that.