This rich and dense smattering of stars is a massive globular cluster, a gravitationally-bound collection of stars that orbits the Milky Way. Globular clusters are denser and more spherical than open star clusters like the famous Pleiades. They typically contain hundreds of thousands of stars that are thought to have formed at roughly the same time. Studies have shown that this globular cluster, named NGC 6139, is home to an aging population of stars. Most globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way are estimated to be over 10 billion years old; as a result they contain some of the oldest stars in our galaxy, formed very early in the galaxy's history. However, their role in galactic evolution is still a matter of study. This cluster is seen roughly in the direction of the centre of the Milky Way, in the constellation of Scorpius (The Scorpion). This constellation is a goldmine of fascinating astronomical objects. Hubble has set its sights on Scorpius many times to observe objects such as the butterfly-like Bug Nebula, surprising binary star systems, and other dazzling globular clusters.
PHOTO: ESA/Hubble/NASA
This rich and dense smattering of stars is a massive globular cluster, a gravitationally-bound collection of stars that orbits the Milky Way. Globular clusters are denser and more spherical than open star clusters like the famous Pleiades. They typically contain hundreds of thousands of stars that are thought to have formed at roughly the same time. Studies have shown that this globular cluster, named NGC 6139, is home to an aging population of stars. Most globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way are estimated to be over 10 billion years old; as a result they contain some of the oldest stars in our galaxy, formed very early in the galaxy's history. However, their role in galactic evolution is still a matter of study. This cluster is seen roughly in the direction of the centre of the Milky Way, in the constellation of Scorpius (The Scorpion). This constellation is a goldmine of fascinating astronomical objects. Hubble has set its sights on Scorpius many times to observe objects such as the butterfly-like Bug Nebula, surprising binary star systems, and other dazzling globular clusters.
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Editor’s Note: Don Lincoln is a senior scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. He is the author of “The Large Hadron Collider: The Extraordinary Story of the Higgs Boson and Other Stuff That Will Blow Your Mind” and produces a series of science education videos. Follow him on Facebook. The opinions expressed in this commentary are his. View more opinion articles on CNN.

(CNN) —  

You’ve seen the movie. A weary radio astronomer is sitting in a control room full of complex electronics, with an earphone held sleepily against her ear. She hears a crackle, then another and another, until the unmistakable sound of a radio transmission is heard. Jolted alert, she checks known frequencies and finds that nothing should be there.

And yet it is. She grabs the red telephone and calls the President, telling him that the first radio transmission from an extraterrestrial intelligence has been received. Usually the plot unfolds with invasions and explosions.

So, that sort of just happened.

Don Lincoln
PHOTO: Courtesy of Don Lincoln
Don Lincoln

But that “sort of” is important, because it’s rare that real science neatly follows a script that can be packed into a two-hour movie. Let me tell you the real story.

Astronomers working at a Canadian radio telescope have reported the observation of fast radio bursts or FRBs. Even more exciting, one FRB has been reported to repeat six times at the same location. This is uncommon and is why those who believe in the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations are so excited.

But it would be hasty to jump from this scientific triumph to the conclusion that ET is trying to contact us.

Here’s what we do know.

FRBs are very short and extremely high-power bursts of radio energy that we detect in our telescopes here on Earth. They typically last only a few milliseconds and are usually broadband (which means they cover a range of frequencies). The burst is generally a single spike of energy, which is stable and constant over its brief duration.

FRBs are also a relatively recently-discovered phenomenon, first observed in 2007. They are observed everywhere in the sky and are not concentrated in the plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Combined with some technical observations of the precise time of arrival of different frequencies, this uniformity heavily points to an extragalactic origin. Whatever is causing FRBs, it is unlikely that they are emitted from within our galaxy.

The most recent announcement has been made by the CHIME (Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) radio telescope, located in the hills of British Columbia. Prior to the announcement, 50-60 FRBs had been observed and only one that had repeated itself. CHIME added 13 additional FRBs and a second repeater.

The low number of observed FRBs is probably due to limitations of the instrumentation. Earlier FRBs were observed at somewhat higher frequencies, while the CHIME telescope was able to look at frequencies in the range of 400 MHz. The next lowest one was at 700 MHz.

It’s also worth noting that the CHIME observatory is in the commissioning phases and is not operating at full sensitivity. When the facility is performing according to expectations, it is likely that it could observe many dozens of FRBs per day.

In spite of some of the more breathless media reports that you will encounter, astronomers do not believe that FRBs are attempts by aliens to contact us. First, they appear spread across the entire sky – with individual sources sometimes located billions of lightyears away from one another.

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Second, it’s just far more likely that FRBs have a natural origin. Because of the short (few millisecond) duration, it seems likely that the source is no larger than a few hundred kilometers in size. If the sources are of extragalactic origin and hundreds of millions of light hears away, they must be incredibly energetic, perhaps releasing in a few milliseconds the same amount of energy our sun releases in 10 to 100 years.