Fears for more tsunamis after hundreds killed in Indonesia

Updated 1:05 PM EST, Mon December 24, 2018
In this Monday, Dec. 24, 2018, photo, Indonesian soldiers carry the bodies of tsunami victims at a beach resort in Tanjung Lesung Indonesia. The tsunami that hit the coasts of Indonesian islands along the Sunda Strait was not big but it was destructive. The waves smashed onto beaches in the darkness Saturday night without warning, ripping houses and hotels from their foundations in seconds and sweeping terrified concertgoers into the sea. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
Achmad Ibrahim/AP
In this Monday, Dec. 24, 2018, photo, Indonesian soldiers carry the bodies of tsunami victims at a beach resort in Tanjung Lesung Indonesia. The tsunami that hit the coasts of Indonesian islands along the Sunda Strait was not big but it was destructive. The waves smashed onto beaches in the darkness Saturday night without warning, ripping houses and hotels from their foundations in seconds and sweeping terrified concertgoers into the sea. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
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CNN —  

More deadly tsunamis could strike the Indonesian coastline in the coming days, authorities warn, as the volcano which triggered the weekend’s devastating wave continues to erupt.

At least 373 people have died from the tsunami, which struck the Indonesian coastline without warning Saturday night. Hundreds more are injured and more than two dozen remain missing.

In the wake of Saturday’s disaster, Indonesian President Joko Widodo ordered Indonesia’s Meteorology, Climatology and Geological Agency (BMKG) to purchase detectors which would provide “early warnings to community.”

Eyewitnesses described fleeing for their lives as beachfront homes were swept away in the wave, which is thought to have been caused by underwater landslides following the eruption of the Anak Krakatau volcano.

According to local media, the wave reached as high as three meters (10 feet).

Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman at Indonesia’s National Disaster Mitigation Agency, warned Sunday that more tsunamis were possible as long as the volcano remained active.

“We are cautioning the people to remain cautious,” Sutopo said. “Agencies are still continuing to analyze the root cause … the Krakatau volcano continues to erupt, which could potentially trigger another tsunami.”

Adding weight to his warnings, Sutopo raised the issue of Indonesia’s outdated tsunami buoy network which he said hasn’t worked properly since 2012.

“Vandalism, limited budget, technical damage caused no tsunami (alerts) at this time,” he said on his official Twitter account.

A lack of warning was also blamed for the high death toll in Indonesia’s October tsunami which killed more than 2,000 people on the western coast of Sulawesi.

Taken by surprise

A crowd was watching Indonesian pop band Seventeen at a show organized by state-run electric company PLN at the Tanjung Lesun beach resort when the massive wave crashed through the stage and threw it into the audience.

In a series of emotional messages posted on Instagram, lead singer Riefian Fajarsyah said that his three band members and Seventeen’s manager, had died.

Fajarsyah’s wife, Dylan, is still missing.

“I am still here - I am not going anywhere - I will pick you and we can come home together sweet heart,” Fajarsyah said.

According to Indonesia’s National Disaster Mitigation Agency, 1,459 people were injured and 128 people are missing. Another 5,665 people have been displaced.

Daniel von Rège, head of mission in Indonesia for Doctors without Borders, said more bodies and injured people were expected to arrive at hospitals across the region over the coming days.

At least 558 houses were destroyed, while nine hotels, 60 restaurants and 350 boats were heavily damaged, an indication of the tsunami’s impact on residential and tourist areas.

No foreigners had been reported killed or injured.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo headed to the disaster zone on Monday morning, saying on his official Twitter he was praying for the victims of the tsunami.

Tsunami caused by underwater landslides

Indonesia’s Ministry of Maritime Affairs confirmed on Monday that the tsunami had been triggered when the Anak Krakatau volcano erupted in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra, prompting a series of underwater landslides.

“Sixty-four hectares of the slope collapsed … Our censors did not sound early warning because they are for tectonic activity not volcanic activity,” spokesman Rahmat Djamaluddin said.

When the displaced rock shifted beneath the water’s surface, it “pushed up” the water on top of it, CNN meteorologist Allison Chinchar said, and generated the tsunami.

02:13 - Source: CNN
How the tsunami occurred without warning

Anak Krakatau sits between the islands of Java and Sumatra.

The tsunami’s impacts were compounded by a tidal wave caused by the full moon, BMKG said in a news release.

Anak Krakatau is known for its 1883 eruption – one of the deadliest in recorded history – that killed more than 36,000 people.

Despite the devastating 2004 Boxing Day tsunami that killed hundreds of thousands of people, Indonesia lacks proper equipment to warn of an incoming tsunami threat.