NEW YORK - OCTOBER 07: A sign in a market window advertises the acceptance of food stamps on October 7, 2010 in New York City. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is proposing an initiative that would prohibit New York City's 1.7 million food stamp recipients from using the stamps, a subsidy for poor residents, to buy soda or other sugary drinks. Bloomberg has stressed that obesity among the poor has reached critical levels. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Spencer Platt/Getty Images
NEW YORK - OCTOBER 07: A sign in a market window advertises the acceptance of food stamps on October 7, 2010 in New York City. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is proposing an initiative that would prohibit New York City's 1.7 million food stamp recipients from using the stamps, a subsidy for poor residents, to buy soda or other sugary drinks. Bloomberg has stressed that obesity among the poor has reached critical levels. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:33
Trump plans to make people work for food stamps (2018)
Now playing
01:21
Lawmaker fires back at Tucker Carlson's QAnon spin
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) asks a question at a hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on September 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Alex Edelman/Pool/Getty Images
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) asks a question at a hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on September 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:40
Trump plans to campaign against Sen. Murkowski in 2022
Biden 03062021
PHOTO: CNN
Biden 03062021
Now playing
02:28
'Help is on the way': Biden speaks after Senate passes relief plan
Now playing
03:04
Schumer: Nobody said it would be easy, but it is done
01 senate stimulus bill 210306
PHOTO: Senate TV
01 senate stimulus bill 210306
Now playing
01:47
Senate passes Biden's $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief bill
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 05: Sen. John Cornyn (R) (R-TX) talks with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) while walking to the U.S. Senate chamber for a vote March 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate continues to debate the latest COVID-19 relief bill.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 05: Sen. John Cornyn (R) (R-TX) talks with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) while walking to the U.S. Senate chamber for a vote March 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate continues to debate the latest COVID-19 relief bill. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:54
Axelrod breaks down Manchin's surprising move
sinema
PHOTO: CNN
sinema
Now playing
01:50
Senator's move has many on the internet outraged
PHOTO: FBI
Now playing
02:58
Trump State Department official charged in Capitol riot
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: U.S. Sen. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) speaks on the floor of the House Chamber during a joint session of congress on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. A group of Republican senators said they would reject the Electoral College votes of several states unless Congress appointed a commission to audit the election results. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: U.S. Sen. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) speaks on the floor of the House Chamber during a joint session of congress on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. A group of Republican senators said they would reject the Electoral College votes of several states unless Congress appointed a commission to audit the election results. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:19
This is what Rep. Gosar was posting days before Capitol riot
John King Magic Wall 0305
PHOTO: CNN
John King Magic Wall 0305
Now playing
02:17
President Biden sending a team to the US-Mexico border
Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner  attends a press conference on September 4, 2020, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner attends a press conference on September 4, 2020, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:50
Jared Kushner disappears from Trump's inner circle
Rep john garamendi 0305
PHOTO: CNN
Rep john garamendi 0305
Now playing
02:33
Rep. Garamendi: Any lawmaker involved in Capitol riots ought to be thrown out of Congress
Protesters gather at Lincoln Park to demand the Emancipation Memorial be taken down on June 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Protesters gather at Lincoln Park to demand the Emancipation Memorial be taken down on June 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
03:01
Why some people want this Abraham Lincoln statue taken down
psaki
PHOTO: CNN
psaki
Now playing
00:56
Psaki fires back at Trump testing czar over vaccine claims
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:04
Avlon: Pence's op-ed is 'way worse than Stockholm syndrome'
(CNN) —  

If Congress won’t make more food stamp recipients work for their benefits, the Trump administration will.

The US Department of Agriculture unveiled a proposed rule Thursday that would expand work requirements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, as the food stamp program is formally known. The proposal comes on the same day as President Donald Trump plans to sign a farm bill that had a similar provision that was eventually eliminated

The overhaul marks the administration’s latest effort to impose work requirements in government assistance programs. In an unprecedented move, it has started allowing states to mandate that Medicaid recipients find employment. Administration officials point to the nation’s low unemployment rate as a reason to push more Americans to self-sufficiency.

“A central theme of the Trump administration has been to expand prosperity for all Americans, which includes helping people lift themselves out of pervasive poverty,” said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, noting it will save $15 billion over 10 years. The proposed rule “restores the dignity of work to a sizable segment of our population, while it’s also respectful of the taxpayers who fund the program.”

The food stamp program already requires non-disabled, working-age adults without dependents to have jobs. They can only receive benefits for three months out of every 36-month period unless they are working or participating in training programs 20 hours a week.

But states can waive that requirement for areas where unemployment is at least 10% or there is an insufficient number of jobs, as defined by the Department of Labor. Already, some red states, including Kentucky and West Virginia, are phasing out or eliminating their waivers.

The proposed rule would make it harder for states to receive those waivers by tightening the definition of areas where there are insufficient jobs, curtailing states’ ability to “bank” exemptions for future years and limiting waivers to only one year instead of up to two, among other changes.

There were 3.8 million Americans who fell into the target category in 2016, the latest federal figure available. Some 2.8 million of them were not working.

The agency’s move could result in hundreds of thousands of beneficiaries losing their assistance, according to the left-leaning Center on Budget & Policy Priorities. Typically, one-third of Americans live in an area where the work requirement is waived.

The proposed rule would cut the number of areas with waivers by three-quarters, according to the agency.

Many low-income people can’t find a good job with steady hours, even in today’s robust economy, said Rachel West, director of poverty research at the left-leaning Center for American Progress. That volatility, combined with the challenge of documenting one’s hours, will result in many folks losing their benefits.

“In low-wage jobs, there is significant churn week-to-week, month-to-month, in hours,” West said. “So many people cannot control their hours in today’s labor market.”

The farm bill passed by the House called for many food stamp recipients to be locked out of the program for up to three years if they fail to work or enroll in job training. The legislation would have also expanded the work requirement to those in their 50’s to work and extended it to parents with school-age children.

The final version, however, did not contain these changes.