CNN
Now playing
02:00
Trump: I won't share my taxes during an audit
Fox News/Twitter
Now playing
01:33
ADL wants Fox News to fire Tucker Carlson over racist comments
CNN
Now playing
02:36
The truth behind Covid-19 vaccines for sale on the dark web
Now playing
04:22
Levi's CEO has message for Mitch McConnell
Now playing
01:54
'You think I'm racist': Former Fox News host storms off camera
Korie Robertson and Willie Robertson of the reality series "Duck Dynasty" attend the Capitol File 58th Presidential Inauguration Reception at Fiola Mare on January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Paul Morigi/Getty Images
Korie Robertson and Willie Robertson of the reality series "Duck Dynasty" attend the Capitol File 58th Presidential Inauguration Reception at Fiola Mare on January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:46
'Duck Dynasty' stars discuss raising biracial son on new show
FOX/"The Masked Singer"
Now playing
01:24
Nick Cannon makes big splash in 'Masked Singer' return
The Drew Barrymore Show/YouTube
Now playing
01:26
'Mom' star speaks out about not having kids in real life
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses.  (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses. (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:53
Restaurants face a nationwide ketchup packet shortage
Camerota Berman both
CNN
Camerota Berman both
Now playing
02:33
CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota gets surprise tribute from co-anchor
Citigroup Chairman Richard Parsons delivers remarks on the US economy at the New York State Bar Association meetings in New York, January 28, 2009. Troubled US banking giant Citigroup last week named Parsons as its new chairman, the longtime top executive at media giant Time Warner, to steer it through its most challenging period.  AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)
EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Citigroup Chairman Richard Parsons delivers remarks on the US economy at the New York State Bar Association meetings in New York, January 28, 2009. Troubled US banking giant Citigroup last week named Parsons as its new chairman, the longtime top executive at media giant Time Warner, to steer it through its most challenging period. AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:47
Dick Parsons: Georgia law is a bald-faced attempt to suppress Black vote
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Picture
Now playing
02:54
'Godzilla vs. Kong' is a pandemic box office hit
Now playing
01:30
5 ways to cut your plastic waste
CNN/Getty Images
Now playing
04:40
Stelter: After elevating Gaetz, Fox News barely covering scandal
NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona
Now playing
01:08
See NASA spacecraft successfully land on an asteroid
Now playing
06:51
Alisyn Camerota's kids wish her good luck in new role on CNN
(CNN) —  

A federal appellate court has rejected a non-profit organization’s attempt to obtain President Donald Trump’s tax records from the Internal Revenue Service by filing a Freedom of Information Act request.

DC Circuit Court Judge Karen Henderson wrote that the President should be afforded the same privacy rights as any other citizen.

“This case presents the question whether a member of the public – here, a nonprofit organization – can use a FOIA request to obtain an unrelated individual’s tax records without his consent,” Henderson wrote in a opinion on behalf of herself and two other appellate judges. “With certain limited exceptions – all inapplicable here – the answer is no.”

Previous presidents have released their tax returns as a matter of course, but Trump has resisted making his records public, both as a candidate and in office.

Henderson wrote that the President’s tax returns are protected by the IRS.

“No one can demand to inspect another’s tax records,” she wrote. “And the (Internal Revenue Code’s) confidentiality protections extend to the ordinary taxpayer and the President alike.”

The decision in the DC federal appeals court affirmed the prior decision of a trial-level judge rejecting the freedom of information suit filed against the IRS by the nonprofit Election Privacy Information Center (EPIC) in 2017.

The nonprofit sent the IRS a FOIA request shortly after the 2016 election seeking Trump’s tax returns stretching back to 2010 “and any other indications of financial relations with the Russian government or Russian businesses,” according to Henderson’s opinion.

The IRS declined the FOIA request and a subsequent request from EPIC, leading the nonprofit to sue the IRS.

The ruling won’t end efforts to win the release of Trump’s tax records.

House Democrats, including members on the House Ways and Means Committee, have said one of their priorities will be requesting the disclosure of the President’s tax returns.

A New York Times report from October found that Trump helped “his parents dodge taxes” in the 1990s, including “instances of outright fraud.”

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump broke with candidate norms and declined to release his tax returns for public review.

Trump has repeatedly claimed he cannot release his tax returns because he’s under audit by the IRS. Being under audit by the IRS, however, does not preclude someone from disclosing their tax returns.

CNN’s Donna Borak and Sophie Tatum contributed to this report.