kitchen table pork farmer 6
kitchen table pork farmer 6
Now playing
03:15
Family's farm at risk as tariffs sink prices
President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, after signing a trade agreement in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Evan Vucci/AP
President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, after signing a trade agreement in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Now playing
01:43
The trade war with China is far from over
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - NOVEMBER 12: President Donald Trump delivers a speech at the Economic Club Of New York in the Grand Ballroom of the Midtown Hilton Hotel on November 12, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/WireImage)
Steven Ferdman/WireImage/WireImage
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - NOVEMBER 12: President Donald Trump delivers a speech at the Economic Club Of New York in the Grand Ballroom of the Midtown Hilton Hotel on November 12, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/WireImage)
Now playing
02:50
The Trump economy is good for his reelection. Will trade stand in the way?
CNN
Now playing
02:34
IMF chief: Trade war could cost world economy $700B
U.S. President Donald Trump meets NATO Secretary General, Jens Stoltenberg at Winfield House in London, Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019. US President Donald Trump will join other NATO heads of state at Buckingham Palace in London on Tuesday to mark the NATO Alliance's 70th birthday. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Evan Vucci/AP
U.S. President Donald Trump meets NATO Secretary General, Jens Stoltenberg at Winfield House in London, Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019. US President Donald Trump will join other NATO heads of state at Buckingham Palace in London on Tuesday to mark the NATO Alliance's 70th birthday. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Now playing
02:51
'Tariff Man' Trump escalates trade tensions
trump macron nato comments response sot vpx_00004001.jpg
trump macron nato comments response sot vpx_00004001.jpg
Now playing
00:52
Trump: I'd wait after 2020 election to strike China deal
CNN
Now playing
01:58
Scaramucci on trade: China wants Trump in power
Container trucks arrive at the Port of Long Beach on August 23, 2019 in Long Beach, California. - President Donald Trump hit back at China on August 23, 2019, in their mounting trade war, raising existing and planned tariffs in retaliation for Beijing's announcement earlier in the day of new duties on American goods. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP)        (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images
Container trucks arrive at the Port of Long Beach on August 23, 2019 in Long Beach, California. - President Donald Trump hit back at China on August 23, 2019, in their mounting trade war, raising existing and planned tariffs in retaliation for Beijing's announcement earlier in the day of new duties on American goods. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP) (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:21
China waives tariffs on some US goods
Photo Illustration: CNNMoney/Getty Images/Shutterstock
Now playing
02:37
The trade war's latest victim: Manufacturing
CNN
Now playing
02:26
Trump trade adviser defends China tariffs: They're working
Getty Images
Now playing
02:04
Why you'll feel the latest round of tariffs
Now playing
02:08
This is what a trade war looks like
Getty Images
Now playing
01:42
This is the worst case scenario for the US-China trade war
A staff member of Huawei uses her mobile phone at the Huawei Digital Transformation Showcase in Shenzhen, China's Guangdong province on March 6, 2019. - Chinese telecom giant Huawei insisted on March 6 its products feature no security "backdoors" for the government, as the normally secretive company gave foreign media a peek inside its state-of-the-art facilities. (Photo by WANG ZHAO / AFP)        (Photo credit should read WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images)
WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images
A staff member of Huawei uses her mobile phone at the Huawei Digital Transformation Showcase in Shenzhen, China's Guangdong province on March 6, 2019. - Chinese telecom giant Huawei insisted on March 6 its products feature no security "backdoors" for the government, as the normally secretive company gave foreign media a peek inside its state-of-the-art facilities. (Photo by WANG ZHAO / AFP) (Photo credit should read WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:29
What blacklisting Huawei means for the US-China trade war
shutterstock/cnnmoney
Now playing
01:44
You'll pay more for these, thanks to tariffs
New York CNN —  

President Donald Trump said Monday that he would release a second round of payments to farmers hurt by tariffs, even after China resumed buying US soybeans last week.

“Today I am making good on my promise to defend our Farmers & Ranchers from unjustified trade retaliation by foreign nations,” Trump tweeted.

Soybean growers have been hit especially hard. China, their biggest foreign market, stopped buying US soybeans in July in retaliation for new American tariffs. But China placed a massive new order last week, as part of a temporary trade truce between the two countries.

Still, it won’t make up for the business that soybean farmers lost this year due to the trade war. The Farm Bureau has estimated that exports to China are down 97% and prices reached historic lows this summer. Many farmers had to put their soybeans in storage after harvesting them this fall.

“While there have been positive movements on the trade front, American farmers are continuing to experience losses due to unjustified trade retaliation by foreign nations,” Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue said in a statement Monday.

“This assistance will help with short-term cash flow issues as we move into the new year,” he added.

The aid package came after multiple countries slapped tariffs on American commodities in retaliation for the Trump administration’s move to impose tariffs on foreign steel and aluminum, as well as on a variety of imports from China.

When the first tariffs went into effect in the spring, Trump himself promised to “make it up” to farmers, calling them “patriots” and saying the policies would be better for them in the long run. In addition to the emergency aid, he made sure the new United States-Mexico-Canada trade deal would begin to open the Canadian dairy market to US producers.

The package allocates a total of about $9.6 billion to producers of almonds, cotton, corn, dairy, pork, soybeans, sorghum, sweet cherries and wheat. Farmers must apply for the aid, and will receive an amount based on how much they have produced.

The US Department of Agriculture released the first half of aid in September and said at the time that additional money might be released in December. Soybean, dairy, wheat and corn farmers have complained that the first round was not enough.

In October, the National Milk Producers Federation asked Perdue for more help, arguing that the industry had lost more than $1 billion since the retaliatory tariffs had been placed on dairy goods in May. A total of $255 million has been set aside for dairy farmers.

Farm industry groups have repeatedly said that while the aid helps, what they really want are open markets so they can sell their produce abroad.

“While this assistance package will help a number of our farm families during this year of severe economic challenge, the best way to provide lasting relief is to continue pushing for trade and tariff reform from trading partners like China, Canada, Mexico, India, Turkey and the European Union,” Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall said in a statement Monday.