Chairman and CEO of Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Carlos Ghosn gestures as he delivers a speech during a visit of French President at the Renault factory, in Maubeuge, northern France, on November 8, 2018. - Macron is on a week-long tour to visit the most iconic French landmarks of the First World War, ahead of celebrations for the 100th anniversary of the November 11, 1918 armistice. (Photo by Ludovic MARIN / AFP)        (Photo credit should read LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images
Chairman and CEO of Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Carlos Ghosn gestures as he delivers a speech during a visit of French President at the Renault factory, in Maubeuge, northern France, on November 8, 2018. - Macron is on a week-long tour to visit the most iconic French landmarks of the First World War, ahead of celebrations for the 100th anniversary of the November 11, 1918 armistice. (Photo by Ludovic MARIN / AFP) (Photo credit should read LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:46
Carlos Ghosn resigns as head of Renault
Now playing
01:36
Michael Bolton wants you to break up with Robinhood
Now playing
01:57
Fed chief downplays inflation concerns
Now playing
04:34
See what has happened to Trump's DC hotel after his loss
Now playing
01:41
Meet the 29-year-old cancer survivor set to make history in space
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 15: MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House before entering on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 15: MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House before entering on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:39
MyPillow and its CEO Mike Lindell sued by Dominion
Bill Gates AC intv 022021
PHOTO: CNN
Bill Gates AC intv 022021
Now playing
02:32
Will Bill Gates go back to shaking hands? Hear his thoughts
02 Bill Gates AC intv 02202021
PHOTO: CNN
02 Bill Gates AC intv 02202021
Now playing
02:13
Bill Gates optimistic about climate policy under Biden WH
Now playing
05:37
Texas mayor: We were not prepared
Now playing
03:05
Watch lawmakers grill Robinhood's CEO
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
04:47
ERCOT CEO explains how Texas power failure happened
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - OCTOBER 15: A person walks by a closed New York City business on October 15, 2020 in New York City. As American workers continue to struggle in an economy brought down by COVID-19, new jobless claims rose to 898,000 last week. It was the highest number since August 22 and represented a gain of 53,000 from the previous week
PHOTO: Spencer Platt/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - OCTOBER 15: A person walks by a closed New York City business on October 15, 2020 in New York City. As American workers continue to struggle in an economy brought down by COVID-19, new jobless claims rose to 898,000 last week. It was the highest number since August 22 and represented a gain of 53,000 from the previous week's upwardly revised total of 845,000. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:11
Weekly initial jobless claims jump to 861,000
Now playing
02:42
A challenging year for women: Millions are out of work
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 18: In this photo illustration a message is seen on Facebook mobile, on February 18, 2021 in Melbourne, Australia. Facebook has banned publishers and users in Australia from posting and sharing news content as the Australian government prepares to pass laws that will require social media companies to pay news publishers for sharing or using content on their platforms. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images AsiaPac/Getty Images
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 18: In this photo illustration a message is seen on Facebook mobile, on February 18, 2021 in Melbourne, Australia. Facebook has banned publishers and users in Australia from posting and sharing news content as the Australian government prepares to pass laws that will require social media companies to pay news publishers for sharing or using content on their platforms. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:05
Facebook blocks news sharing in Australia in response to government proposal
PHOTO: Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
Now playing
00:58
Watch Trump's Atlantic City casino implode
People walk by a closed restaurant in Rockefeller Center on the last Sunday before Christmas on December 20, 2020 in New York City. Rockefeller Center, where the annual Christmas tree is displayed among other holiday attractions, has far less crowds this year and numerous restrictions due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. New York City has seen a slow uptick in COVID hospitalizations over the last few weeks but is still far below the numbers witnessed in the spring. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Spencer Platt/Getty Images
People walk by a closed restaurant in Rockefeller Center on the last Sunday before Christmas on December 20, 2020 in New York City. Rockefeller Center, where the annual Christmas tree is displayed among other holiday attractions, has far less crowds this year and numerous restrictions due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. New York City has seen a slow uptick in COVID hospitalizations over the last few weeks but is still far below the numbers witnessed in the spring. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:12
These owners had to close their iconic restaurants during the pandemic
(CNN Business) —  

Renault has given CEO Carlos Ghosn’s pay arrangements a clean bill of health but has still not come to a conclusion about allegations of financial crime that led to his indictment in Japan.

Renault said in a statement that its board of directors has now been briefed on the investigation by alliance partner Nissan that led to Ghosn’s arrest on November 19. But the French carmaker has asked its lawyers to update the board again “promptly” after further assessing the information provided by Nissan.

The statement also noted that Renault still “does not have information concerning Carlos Ghosn’s defense.” Ghosn remains locked in a Tokyo jail.

His legal troubles have plunged the future of the alliance he forged between Renault (RNSDF) Nissan (NSANY) and Mitsubishi Motors (MMTOF) into doubt, and cost him the chairmanship of both Japanese carmakers.

Renault has appointed interim management, while keeping Ghosn in his positions as CEO and chairman.

Meanwhile, it has been conducting its own review of Ghosn’s pay package at the French carmaker between 2015 and 2018. It said Thursday that the preliminary findings of that investigation showed no irregularities.

Following Renault’s announcement, Nissan said Friday that its board “made a unanimous decision regarding the misconduct of Mr. Ghosn and has offered to share that same information directly with the Renault board so they can make their own informed decision.”

Tokyo prosecutors on Monday indicted Ghosn, 64, on accusations he under-reported his income in Nissan corporate filings by about 5 billion yen ($44 million) between 2010 and 2015.

They also rearrested him on additional allegations that he also under-reported his income by more than 4.2 billion yen ($38 million) between 2015 and 2017. He will remain in police custody until at least December 20.

Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported Monday, citing unidentified sources, that Ghosn is denying the allegations against him.

Nissan said last month that an internal investigation discovered “significant” financial misconduct by Ghosn following a whistleblower report.

“The evidence presented to Nissan’s board last month was substantial and compelling enough to result in a unanimous vote. We believe any objective review would find this evidence equally convincing,” a Nissan spokesman said on Wednesday.

The indictment of Ghosn raises the prospect of a challenging court battle for the Brazilian-born business leader. He filed a complaint against his detention earlier this week but it was rejected by a Tokyo court.

More than 99% of people charged with a crime in Japan are eventually convicted, according to experts. The maximum punishment in Japan for filing a false financial statement is 10 years in prison and a fine of 10 million yen ($89,000).

Both Nissan and Renault have said Ghosn’s arrest won’t affect their alliance, which produces one out of every nine vehicles worldwide. Officials from the French and Japanese governments have echoed those sentiments.

Nissan said Friday that it “remains steadfast in its commitment to the alliance and will continue to support its partners in the best interests of shareholders, customers and employees.”

Jethro Mullen contributed to this article.