A picture shows the messages "#Me too" and #Balancetonporc ("expose your pig") on the hand of a protester during a gathering against gender-based and sexual violence called by the Effronte-e-s Collective, on the Place de la Republique square in Paris on October 29, 2017.

#MeToo hashtag, is the campaign encouraging women to denounce experiences of sexual abuse that has swept across social media in the wake of the wave of allegations targeting Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.
 / AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAY        (Photo credit should read BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images)
BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images
A picture shows the messages "#Me too" and #Balancetonporc ("expose your pig") on the hand of a protester during a gathering against gender-based and sexual violence called by the Effronte-e-s Collective, on the Place de la Republique square in Paris on October 29, 2017. #MeToo hashtag, is the campaign encouraging women to denounce experiences of sexual abuse that has swept across social media in the wake of the wave of allegations targeting Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. / AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAY (Photo credit should read BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:31
How #MeToo spread from Hollywood to the high court (2018)
CNN
Now playing
05:30
Unprecedented footage shows front line of Ukrainian conflict with Russia
Family Photo/WCCO
Now playing
01:41
Police killing of Daunte Wright in Minnesota sparks protests
CNN/Getty Images
Now playing
05:29
Anti-Defamation League CEO calls for Fox News to fire Tucker Carlson
This satellite photo from Planet Labs Inc. shows Iran's Natanz nuclear facility on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. Iran's Natanz nuclear site suffered a problem Sunday, April 11, involving its electrical distribution grid just hours after starting up new advanced centrifuges that more quickly enrich uranium, state TV reported. It was the latest incident to strike one of Tehran's most-secured sites amid negotiations over the tattered atomic accord with world powers. (Planet Labs Inc. via AP)
Planet Labs Inc./AP
This satellite photo from Planet Labs Inc. shows Iran's Natanz nuclear facility on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. Iran's Natanz nuclear site suffered a problem Sunday, April 11, involving its electrical distribution grid just hours after starting up new advanced centrifuges that more quickly enrich uranium, state TV reported. It was the latest incident to strike one of Tehran's most-secured sites amid negotiations over the tattered atomic accord with world powers. (Planet Labs Inc. via AP)
Now playing
02:21
Iran claims 'terrorist action' caused blackout at nuclear site
jason carroll vaccine hesitancy maine pkg ac360 vpx_00000000.png
jason carroll vaccine hesitancy maine pkg ac360 vpx_00000000.png
Now playing
03:28
Health advocates go door-to-door to fight vaccine hesitancy
Now playing
02:48
GOP governor calls Trump's RNC remarks 'divisive'
CNN
Now playing
02:42
Michigan sees alarming uptick in Covid-19 cases
WASHINGTON, D.C. - APRIL 19, 2018:  The U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C., is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Judicial Branch of government. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
Robert Alexander/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, D.C. - APRIL 19, 2018: The U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C., is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Judicial Branch of government. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:39
SCOTUS blocks California Covid restriction on religious activities
Chris Hollins
CNN
Chris Hollins
Now playing
03:09
'Troubling': Ex-Harris County clerk reacts to leaked recording of Texas GOP official
ITN
Now playing
01:15
Prince Charles speaks following Prince Philip's death
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 10:  U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) (L) and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) (R) listen to remarks during a Congressional Gold Medal presentation ceremony at the Emancipation Hall of the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center September 10, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The Congressional Gold Medal was awarded in honor to the men and women who were killed during the September 11th attacks for their heroic sacrifices.  One of the three medals will be provided to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania, the second will go to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York, and the third one will be directed to the Pentagon Memorial at the Pentagon.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 10: U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) (L) and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) (R) listen to remarks during a Congressional Gold Medal presentation ceremony at the Emancipation Hall of the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center September 10, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The Congressional Gold Medal was awarded in honor to the men and women who were killed during the September 11th attacks for their heroic sacrifices. One of the three medals will be provided to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania, the second will go to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York, and the third one will be directed to the Pentagon Memorial at the Pentagon. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:22
Harry Reid reacts to colorful anecdote in Boehner's book
CNN
Now playing
05:15
This event in Florida is requiring proof of vaccination
Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the NRA, arrives prior to a speech by US President Donald Trump at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meeting at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 26, 2019.
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the NRA, arrives prior to a speech by US President Donald Trump at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meeting at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 26, 2019.
Now playing
02:30
NRA CEO says he needed to take shelter on a yacht
A second eruption of the La Soufriere volcano occurred at approximately 2:45pm local time, according to the UWI Seismic Research Centre.
UWI Seismic Research Centre
A second eruption of the La Soufriere volcano occurred at approximately 2:45pm local time, according to the UWI Seismic Research Centre.
Now playing
01:44
St. Vincent volcano erupts in Southern Caribbean
Getty Images
Now playing
02:25
Hear what Clyburn wants to tell Manchin after CNN interview
pool
Now playing
02:18
GOP congressman calls on Gaetz to resign
(CNN) —  

Astrophysicist and author Neil deGrasse Tyson has denied allegations of sexual misconduct made against him by three women.

Last month, three women told Patheos, a religion and spirituality website, that Tyson harassed them and made inappropriate sexual advances as early as 1984 and in recent years.

“Accusations can damage a reputation and a marriage. Sometimes irreversibly. I see myself as loving husband and as a public servant – a scientist and educator who serves at the will of the public. I am grateful for the support I’ve received from those who continue to respect and value me and my work,” he wrote in a lengthy Facebook post titled “On Being Accused.”

Tyson disputed or offered a different version of the allegations against him.

Katelyn N. Allers, an associate professor of physics and astronomy at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania, told Patheos that Tyson grabbed her arm and reached into her dress while looking at her tattoo of the solar system. She said the incident happened during a party after a gathering of the American Astronomical Society in 2009.

While their interaction may have not been an assault, Allers said it was a clear sign that Tyson was capable of “creepy behavior,” the website reported.

“My experience with him is he’s not someone who has great respect for female bodily autonomy,” she told Patheos.

Tyson, the host of the 2014 series “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey,” said he didn’t know Allers felt uncomfortable by his behavior.

He said his action “was simply a search (for the tattoo) under the covered part of her shoulder of the sleeveless dress.”

“I only just learned (nine years after) that she thought this behavior creepy,” he wrote. “That was never my intent and I’m deeply sorry to have made her feel that way.”

Another woman, Ashley Watson, told the website that she quit her job as Tyson’s assistant last summer after he attempted to persuade her into sex.

Watson told Patheos that she felt pressured to impress her boss and accepted an invitation from Tyson to his place. There, the scientist spoke about people needing human physical releases and gave her an “awkward and incredibly intimate handshake.”

Later, when she was leaving, “Tyson then allegedly put his hands on her shoulders, and said he wanted to hug her, but if he did, he’d ‘just want more,’” the website reported.

In his post, Tyson described multiple interactions with his female production assistant, including inviting her to his place for wine and cheese during the last week of production. He said the woman later told him that she was “creeped out” and viewed the invitation as an attempt to seduce her. After he apologized profusely, the woman said that would be her last day working there.

Tyson said their only physical interaction was a handshake he said he learned from a Native elder that he considered special, he wrote.

“You extend your thumb forward during the handshake to feel the other person’s vital spirit energy – the pulse,” he wrote.

A third woman, Tchiya Amet, alleges Tyson drugged and raped her in 1984 while they were graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin.

She recalled blacking out after Tyson gave her a drink and waking up naked on his bed.

She filed a police report years later, the website reported, and has written multiple posts about the incident since 2014.

Tyson disputed the allegation, noting they had briefly dated in graduate school “but the chemistry wasn’t there.”

“[A]ccording to her blog posts, the drug and rape allegation comes from an assumption of what happened to her during a night that she cannot remember,” he wrote. “It is as though a false memory had been implanted, which, because it never actually happened, had to be remembered as an evening she doesn’t remember.”

Fox Entertainment and National Geographic, the networks airing Tyson’s show, announced Friday they would investigate the allegations, the New York Times reported.

In his post, Tyson also welcomed an investigation by the networks.

CNN has reached out to both networks for comment.

Tyson also said he did not immediately speak publicly on the issue because he believed “serious accusations should not be adjudicated in the press.”

“But clearly I cannot continue to stay silent,” he wrote.