BEIJING - JANUARY 27:  A shopper chooses granny smith apples at the newly-opened Tesco supermarket on January 27, 2007 in Beijing, China. The UK giant opened its first own-brand supermarket in Beijing after investing in 46 stores across China under the name of its Chinese partner, Le Gou, which translates as "Happy Shopping". Tesco's new store in Beijing is competing with other international chains that are well established in China, such as Wal-Mart and Carrefour.  (Photo by Andrew Wong/Getty Images)
Andrew Wong/Getty Images AsiaPac/Getty Images
BEIJING - JANUARY 27: A shopper chooses granny smith apples at the newly-opened Tesco supermarket on January 27, 2007 in Beijing, China. The UK giant opened its first own-brand supermarket in Beijing after investing in 46 stores across China under the name of its Chinese partner, Le Gou, which translates as "Happy Shopping". Tesco's new store in Beijing is competing with other international chains that are well established in China, such as Wal-Mart and Carrefour. (Photo by Andrew Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:30
How the climate crisis could affect your wallet (2018)
Multiple agencies are on the scene of a shooting at Austin-East Magnet High School. Multiple gunshot victims reported, including a KPD officer. The investigation remains active at this time. Please avoid the area.
From Knoxville Police TN/Twitter
Multiple agencies are on the scene of a shooting at Austin-East Magnet High School. Multiple gunshot victims reported, including a KPD officer. The investigation remains active at this time. Please avoid the area.
Now playing
02:43
One person dead, officer injured after shooting at Knoxville high school
CNN
Now playing
04:48
Fauci talks about what he is comfortable doing now that he's fully vaccinated
CNN
Now playing
05:30
Unprecedented footage shows front line of Ukrainian conflict with Russia
Family Photo/WCCO
Now playing
01:41
Police killing of Daunte Wright in Minnesota sparks protests
CNN/Getty Images
Now playing
05:29
Anti-Defamation League CEO calls for Fox News to fire Tucker Carlson
This satellite photo from Planet Labs Inc. shows Iran's Natanz nuclear facility on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. Iran's Natanz nuclear site suffered a problem Sunday, April 11, involving its electrical distribution grid just hours after starting up new advanced centrifuges that more quickly enrich uranium, state TV reported. It was the latest incident to strike one of Tehran's most-secured sites amid negotiations over the tattered atomic accord with world powers. (Planet Labs Inc. via AP)
Planet Labs Inc./AP
This satellite photo from Planet Labs Inc. shows Iran's Natanz nuclear facility on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. Iran's Natanz nuclear site suffered a problem Sunday, April 11, involving its electrical distribution grid just hours after starting up new advanced centrifuges that more quickly enrich uranium, state TV reported. It was the latest incident to strike one of Tehran's most-secured sites amid negotiations over the tattered atomic accord with world powers. (Planet Labs Inc. via AP)
Now playing
02:21
Iran claims 'terrorist action' caused blackout at nuclear site
jason carroll vaccine hesitancy maine pkg ac360 vpx_00000000.png
jason carroll vaccine hesitancy maine pkg ac360 vpx_00000000.png
Now playing
03:28
Health advocates go door-to-door to fight vaccine hesitancy
Now playing
02:48
GOP governor calls Trump's RNC remarks 'divisive'
CNN
Now playing
02:42
Michigan sees alarming uptick in Covid-19 cases
WASHINGTON, D.C. - APRIL 19, 2018:  The U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C., is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Judicial Branch of government. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
Robert Alexander/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, D.C. - APRIL 19, 2018: The U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C., is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Judicial Branch of government. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:39
SCOTUS blocks California Covid restriction on religious activities
Chris Hollins
CNN
Chris Hollins
Now playing
03:09
'Troubling': Ex-Harris County clerk reacts to leaked recording of Texas GOP official
ITN
Now playing
01:15
Prince Charles speaks following Prince Philip's death
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 10:  U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) (L) and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) (R) listen to remarks during a Congressional Gold Medal presentation ceremony at the Emancipation Hall of the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center September 10, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The Congressional Gold Medal was awarded in honor to the men and women who were killed during the September 11th attacks for their heroic sacrifices.  One of the three medals will be provided to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania, the second will go to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York, and the third one will be directed to the Pentagon Memorial at the Pentagon.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 10: U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) (L) and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) (R) listen to remarks during a Congressional Gold Medal presentation ceremony at the Emancipation Hall of the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center September 10, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The Congressional Gold Medal was awarded in honor to the men and women who were killed during the September 11th attacks for their heroic sacrifices. One of the three medals will be provided to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania, the second will go to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York, and the third one will be directed to the Pentagon Memorial at the Pentagon. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:22
Harry Reid reacts to colorful anecdote in Boehner's book
CNN
Now playing
05:15
This event in Florida is requiring proof of vaccination
Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the NRA, arrives prior to a speech by US President Donald Trump at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meeting at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 26, 2019.
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the NRA, arrives prior to a speech by US President Donald Trump at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meeting at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 26, 2019.
Now playing
02:30
NRA CEO says he needed to take shelter on a yacht
A second eruption of the La Soufriere volcano occurred at approximately 2:45pm local time, according to the UWI Seismic Research Centre.
UWI Seismic Research Centre
A second eruption of the La Soufriere volcano occurred at approximately 2:45pm local time, according to the UWI Seismic Research Centre.
Now playing
01:44
St. Vincent volcano erupts in Southern Caribbean
(CNN) —  

The average global temperature is much higher and rising more rapidly than “anything modern civilization has experienced,” according to David Easterling, one of the authors of a new US government report that delivers a dire warning about our future.

Thousands more could die, food will be scarcer, and the US economy could lose hundreds of billions of dollars – or, in the worst-case scenario, more than 10% of its GDP – by the end of the century.

Released Friday, the Fourth National Climate Assessment was put together with the help of 1,000 people, including 300 leading scientists, roughly half from outside the government. It comes from the US Global Change Research Program, a team of 13 federal agencies, and is the second of two volumes. The first, released in November 2017, concluded that there is “no convincing alternative explanation” for the changing climate other than “human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases.”

The report breaks down the possible impact of climate change by US region and looks at the effects climate change will have on health, economy and infrastructure. Here are some of its key predictions:

1. Crop production will decline.

Farmers will face extremely tough times. The quality and quantity of crops will decline across the United States due to higher temperatures, drought and flooding.

In parts of the Midwest, farms will be able to produce only about 75% of the corn they produce today, and the southern part of the region could lose more than 25% of its soybeans.

By 2100, higher temperatures in places like Yolo County, California, could make it too hot to cultivate walnuts. Climate change could also severely limit almond production in California.

2. Cows could have it bad.

Heat stress, which cost the dairy industry $1.2 billion in 2010, will become an even bigger issue, potentially causing average dairy production to fall between 0.60% and 1.35% over the next 12 years.

Livestock for meat could struggle to find plants to graze on, and heat stress could impact their numbers.

3. Food sources from the sea will decline.

There won’t be as many oysters, shrimp or crab due to ocean acidification. The report predicts a $230 million loss for that industry by the end of the century. Annual oyster harvests in the Southeast will decline by 46% under the worst-case scenario by the end of the century.

Fish stocks overall may decline as red tides – algae bloom that deplete oxygen in the water and can kill sea life – become more common. It was a red tide that triggered a state of emergency in Florida in August.

The coral reefs that support diverse fish life off the Florida Keys are already declining and could be lost in the coming decades due to higher temperatures.

River fish could also die off; higher temperatures have already led to die-offs due to proliferative kidney disease.

Warmer temperatures were a problem for endangered sockeye salmon and Chinook in the Columbia River when they suffered a serious die-off in 2015.

4. Food- and waterborne illness will spread.

Weather that is bad for farmers is good for spreading food- and waterborne diseases, and more people will be exposed to them.

Marine toxins and pathogens will contaminate seafood. The waterborne bacteria Vibrio, which is already causing thousands of illnesses a year, will expand to seafood in northern seas and affect oysters grown in the Northeast.

Floods and heavy rains that can cause sewers to overflow can contaminate drinking water, leading to more stomach problems, studies have shown.

Droughts could cause more skin and eye infections, due to lack of water for personal hygiene. Other waterborne diseases that could spread include hepatitis A, salmonellosis, shigellosis, typhoid and E. coli.

5. Bugs will bug us more.

Weather that’s bad for crops is good for bugs.

Mosquitoes and ticks love warmer and wetter temperatures. That means diseases such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika will be more widespread. West Nile cases are expected to more than double by 2050 due to increasing temperatures.

The Northeast could see more cases of Lyme disease as the tick season expands in states like Maine and Pennsylvania.

6. It will be hard to breathe.

Asthma and allergies will also be worse due to climate change. The pollen season will intensify and lengthen in parts of the United States due to warmer temperatures.

Oak pollen in the Midwest will send more people to the emergency room for asthma, costing up to $170,000 annually, according to the report.

Urban areas with higher concentrations of CO2 will see more allergy-causing plants such as ragweed growing faster.

Increased rain in some areas will encourage mold growth indoors, which can make asthma symptoms worse.

7. Mental health will be challenged.