Experimental treatment helps 2 out of 3 peanut allergy sufferers, study finds

(CNN)Sometimes, Ellis Glover would be forced to leave her friends and sit at a lunch table where no one was eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

"I wanted to sit with my good, good friends, but I couldn't," the 10-year-old said. "If you're a kid and you have a food allergy, it's harder on you. You're missing out on a lot of stuff other children can have. I always want to try peanut stuff."
Mom Monica Glover said the family discovered Ellis' peanut allergy when she was about 3. The tipoff: a skin reaction around her mouth after she was given food with a small amount of peanuts in it. "We were lucky to have discovered it that way. That was a mild reaction," Glover said, and a doctor confirmed the allergy through tests.
The discovery was "distressing," Glover said. Accidental exposure to peanuts has happened, resulting in "severe stomach cramps and vomiting," she said. "Essentially, we have to live in fear all the time of Ellis being inadvertently exposed to peanuts and having a reaction that is potentially life-threatening."