When her naked selfies were posted online, she thought life couldn't get worse. Then she was arrested

Updated 1:58 PM ET, Sun November 11, 2018

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds.

CNN is committed to covering gender inequality wherever it occurs in the world. This story is part of As Equals, a year-long series.

Kampala, Uganda When model and socialite Judith Heard was asked to pay $3,000 in blackmail money to stop her stolen nude selfies being published online, she said her heart skipped a beat.
The 32-year-old from Uganda didn't pay up and some time after that 2013 exchange, her explicit photos were posted online without her consent.
In May 2018, it happened again. Nude photos of Heard were leaked online, but this time they were followed by a warrant for her arrest.
The mother-of-three was charged under Uganda's Anti-Pornography Act, which criminalizes the production and circulation of "pornographic material," including on messaging apps like WhatsApp.
"I would never think of putting out my nude pictures," Heard said.
She believes that they were taken from a stolen phone or laptop and says she never sent the photos to anyone.
    "People should understand the pain we go through," Heard said about being the victim of revenge porn. When her photos were first leaked, she says it caused strife with family members and almost ended her marriage.
    The people who stole her photos and shared them should be arrested -- not her, Heard added.
    But the Ugandan government's new Pornography Control Committee (PCC) takes a different view.
    In June 2018, the PCC, under the direction of the Ministry of Ethics, issued arrest warrants for eight people -- including Heard.
    Among those arrested were women who say their nude pictures and sex tapes were shared online without their consent, police spokesperson Patrick Onnyango told CNN, detailing three separate cases, including Heard's. Student and model Lilian Rukundo and police officer Esther Akol were the other two cases cited by police.
    Akol, whose partially-nude photograph taken in uniform circulated online, claims that the image was Photoshopped, Onnyango said.
    "She says her ex-boyfriend is the one who maliciously Photoshopped what you saw and started circulating on the social media," the police spokesperson explained.
    PCC chair Annette Kezaabu referenced Akol's case in a press conference, telling reporters that a woman can be both a victim and perpetrator at the same time.
    "We know that she took this photo privately, but we also ask, why did she take it in the first place?" Kezaabu asked members of the press.