MINNEAPOLIS, MN - SEPTEMBER 23: Minneapolis resident Robin Marty takes a selfie with an "I Voted" sign after voting early at the Northeast Early Voting Center on September 23, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Minnesota residents can vote in the general election every day until Election Day on November 8. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

Here's what each US state says about taking ballot selfies

Updated 4:56 PM ET, Fri November 2, 2018

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(CNN)You may be tempted to post a photo on Instagram when you hit the voting booth on Tuesday, but selfies with your ballot could get you in trouble in some states.

So, before you pull a lever or tap a touchscreen on Election Day, know which states allow no selfies, some selfies and all selfies.

Don't even think about it

Put your phones away, because these states don't allow photographs in polling places or voting booths, or both. Granted, the laws aren't often enforced. (It's more of a "someone gently asks you to stop" kind of thing.) But that doesn't mean you should test the rules.
Alabama: The state's up-to-date voter information is clear: No photography in polling places (ergo, no selfies).
Arizona: You can't take photos inside or within 75 feet of a polling place.
    Florida: You can't take photos in polling places and can't show your completed ballots to others. If you didn't know, you're not alone. In July, three politicians got busted for taking photos of their primary ballots, not knowing they were violating the law. Whoops!
    Georgia: No photography in polling places + no cell phone use in polling places = no selfies.
    Illinois: One of the most anti-selfie states in the country. Photography is not allowed at the polling place and its law states, "any person who knowingly marks his ballot or casts his vote on a voting machine or voting device so that it can be observed by another person ... shall be guilty of a Class 4 felony."
    Iowa: No photos are allowed in the voting booths.
    Maryland: Per Maryland's voter information page, "You cannot use your cell phone, pager, camera, and computer equipment in an early voting center or at a polling place." Remember guys, NO PAGERS.
    Michigan: No cameras in polling places.
    New Jersey: Don't share your ballot online and don't take pictures. New Jersey law prohibits voters from showing their ballot to anyone else and officials say photographs aren't allowed inside polling places.
      New York: Nope. Last year, a federal judge even upheld a state law barring voters from taking photos of their marked ballots.
      North Carolina: The only way you can take pictures is if you have the permission of the voter (you) -- and the permission of the chief judge of the precinct (not you). Considering the chief judge probably has better things to do, it's a no.
      Ohio: It's illegal to show off your ballot online, so why bother? The state has prohibited that for years.
      South Carolina: The word straight from the state's Election Commission: "State law prohibits anyone from showing their ballot to another person. The use of cameras is not allowed inside the voting booth."
      South Dakota: No!
      Tennessee: Justin Timberlake brought selfies back!!! Ok not really. The Tennessee Senate approved a bill to let residents use their phones at polling places, but it hasn't become law yet. For now, John Gleason of the Senate Judiciary says you're outta luck. "Thanks to a law passed in 2015, electronics are permitted in the polling place, but you can't use them," he tells CNN.