CNN
Now playing
04:21
Trump campaign manager explains unprecedented ad
Now playing
01:57
Chuck Hagel criticizes Trump's statement on Afghanistan
gun laws shootings Comer pamela brown nr vpx _00015627.png
CNN
gun laws shootings Comer pamela brown nr vpx _00015627.png
Now playing
02:23
'I can't answer that': Kentucky lawmaker responds to CNN on gun policy
Now playing
02:39
National security adviser: Russia will face consequences if Navalny dies in prison
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from committee assignments over her remarks about QAnon and other conspiracy theories.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from committee assignments over her remarks about QAnon and other conspiracy theories.
Now playing
03:20
Marjorie Taylor Greene lashes out at media after backlash over controversial caucus
AP
Now playing
03:16
Maxine Waters: Jim Jordan is a bully and I shut him down
US Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, leaves her office on Capitol Hill on February 4, 2021 in Washington, DC.
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
US Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, leaves her office on Capitol Hill on February 4, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
03:51
Marjorie Taylor Greene launching 'America First' caucus
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on Russia at the White House in Washington, DC on April 15, 2021. - The United States announced sanctions and the expulsion of 10 Russian diplomats Thursday in retaliation for what Washington says is the Kremlin's US election interference, a massive cyberattack and other hostile activity.
JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on Russia at the White House in Washington, DC on April 15, 2021. - The United States announced sanctions and the expulsion of 10 Russian diplomats Thursday in retaliation for what Washington says is the Kremlin's US election interference, a massive cyberattack and other hostile activity.
Now playing
02:22
White House backtracks on refugees decision after criticism
Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images
Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
02:44
'National embarrassment': Biden reacts to mass shootings
MOSCOW, RUSSIA - APRIL 15:  Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) talks to talks to Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov during a meeting with Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov in the Kremlin on April 15, 2013 in in Moscow, Russia. Karimov is on a state visit to Russia. (Photo by Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images)
Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images
MOSCOW, RUSSIA - APRIL 15: Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) talks to talks to Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov during a meeting with Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov in the Kremlin on April 15, 2013 in in Moscow, Russia. Karimov is on a state visit to Russia. (Photo by Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:07
Russia to expel 10 US diplomats in 'tit-for-tat response' to Biden sanctions
Now playing
03:10
Avlon: Here's what we know 100 days since the Capitol riot
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on October 22, 2018. - US national security advisor John Bolton is in Moscow holding meetings with senior Russian officials following Washington's weekend announcement of withdrawal from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, known as the INF. (Photo by Mladen ANTONOV / AFP)        (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)
Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on October 22, 2018. - US national security advisor John Bolton is in Moscow holding meetings with senior Russian officials following Washington's weekend announcement of withdrawal from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, known as the INF. (Photo by Mladen ANTONOV / AFP) (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:17
Political scientist: US-Russia relations are in the toilet
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) speaks during a news conference on immigration to condemn the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, outside the US Capitol on June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images)
Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) speaks during a news conference on immigration to condemn the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, outside the US Capitol on June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:39
Governor settles with former campaign staffer who accused her of sexual mistreatment
pool/cnn
Now playing
01:56
Hear what Dr. Gupta said when Cruz went maskless before
Now playing
02:30
Biden's decision to withdraw from Afghanistan is personal for this lawmaker
President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, about the withdrawal of the remainder of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.=
Andrew Harnik/AP
President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, about the withdrawal of the remainder of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.=
Now playing
02:10
Why Biden made his Afghanistan announcement in this particular room
(CNN) —  

Donald Trump busts through so many norms of politics that it shouldn’t be surprising he is at it again this final full week of campaigning before the midterms – launching a 2018 ad for Republicans, paid for and produced by his own 2020 campaign.

Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale tells CNN it is a $6 million ad buy on television and digital. The 60-second spot is focused on the booming economy, with flashbacks to the economic crisis that started 10 years ago, warning that it “could all go away if we don’t remember where we came from.”

The move is unprecedented, considering the President is not actually on the ballot November 6. But then again, so was formally filing for re-election on inauguration day January 20, 2017.

“What this ad shows is things are getting better. We need to continue to vote Republican and to continue to move forward with the president’s agenda,” Parscale told CNN in an interview.

“Sometimes success can bring complacency. We have to go remind them. We have to remind them that the economy is not just a given in the United States. It actually takes work,” he added.

It has echoes of Ronald Reagan’s famous 1984 “Morning In America” re-election ad, which Parscale says he watched and considered (quick to say he was eight years old when it came out) but notes it has, “a lot more emotional hook and utilizing modern technology, what we’ve learned about making TV commercials on the commercial side of business.”

It is in fact produced to be more Superbowl commercial than political ad – the same emotional approach used to sell Trump 2016.

“You have to make people feel things. I think that’s what commercials are, from a commercial for a car, a phone or anything that might be, they want to do it. The first iPhone was sold by how exciting it was to hold pictures of your family, not how great a phone it was,” recalls Parscale, who was in marketing long before politics.

He said the ad was developed over several months, which he argues they had the time and money to do with the Trump campaign up and running so early.

“Most political ads barely get a week or two. The way we did that is significant. That’s more of how you do it in the commercial world. You really plan a product launch. In 2020 we have Trump 2.0, another product launch. It’s the what are we going to do for four more years, and we have to be ready to sell that,” Parscale explained.

Trump 2020 has already raised over $100 million, which is causing some sore feelings among Republicans who are on the ballot now, and accuse team Trump of gobbling up campaigning money they could be raising for 2018.

“Yeah, well, I think that’s unfortunate,” Parscale said of the GOP grumbling, “I think we’re doing everything with that money we can to help them.”

“Almost every single thing I’ve done for ‘18 has been completely focused on the midterms, like the unprecedented over $20 million we’re spending to do it. $300,000, $400,000 rallies. $700,000 rallies. I don’t think anyone in history has ever done that,” he added.

Parscale noted that the rallies are “becoming shows” where “fans walk out now and say ‘that was awesome.’”

The Trump rhetoric and violence

Part of the Trump show of course tends to be harsh rhetoric towards political opponents, and the media.

CNN footage from one of those rallies last year shows Cesar Sayoc lapping up the anti-CNN sentiment. Federal authorities say they have proof that Sayoc sent 14 mail bombs to critics of the President, including two of the president’s Democratic predecessors. Another package bomb forced the evacuation of CNN’s New York offices after it was discovered in the mailroom.

Does the President’s rhetoric bear any responsibility? When pressed, Parscale insisted the answer is no.

“Let me be very clear. I don’t think the President or myself in this campaign, we don’t condone violence in any way. I want to be very clear with that. Do I think there’s a fight against the media and the Democrats? Yes, but I think it’s one that’s done with our heart and our minds. I don’t believe that it’s ever something being done with the fist. I would never ever believe that or ever try to do anything or would ever condone violence against anyone in the media or anyone in this country. I don’t think this President does either,” Parscale responded.

It’s not only rallies. Tru