Tammy Hepps, Kate Rothstein and her daughter, Simone Rothstein, 16, pray from a prayerbook a block away from the site of a mass shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood on October 27, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Jeff Swensen/Getty Images
Tammy Hepps, Kate Rothstein and her daughter, Simone Rothstein, 16, pray from a prayerbook a block away from the site of a mass shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood on October 27, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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Law enforcement officers secure the scene where multiple people were shot, Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018, at the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood. (Alexandra Wimley/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP)
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Isabel Kinnane Smith of Allderdice is comforted by Lesley Britton, a math teacher at the school, at a vigil blocks from where an active shooter shot multiple people at Tree of Life Congregation synagogue on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018, in the Squirrel Hill section of Pittsburgh. (Stephanie Strasburg/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP)
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Isabel Kinnane Smith of Allderdice is comforted by Lesley Britton, a math teacher at the school, at a vigil blocks from where an active shooter shot multiple people at Tree of Life Congregation synagogue on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018, in the Squirrel Hill section of Pittsburgh. (Stephanie Strasburg/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP)
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(CNN) —  

The massacre of 11 people at a synagogue in Pittsburgh was felt around the nation and the globe.

Here are some of the statements of condolences from world leaders,

Pope Francis

Pope Francis
VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Images
Pope Francis

“I express my closeness to the city of Pittsburgh, in the United States of America, and in particular to the Jewish community, struck yesterday by a terrible attack in the synagogue,” the Pope said during his traditional Sunday Angelus address from the window of the Apostolic Palace at the Vatican.

“May the Most High welcome the deceased in his peace, comfort their families and sustain the injured. In reality, we are all wounded by this inhuman act of violence,” the Pope said. “May the Lord help us to end the outbreaks of hate that develop in our society, reinforcing a sense of humanity, respect for life, moral and civil values and a holy fear of God, who is Love and Father of all.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

Netanyahu issued a video statement, posted to Twitter.

“The entire people of Israel grieve with the families of the dead,” he said. “We stand together with the Jewish community of Pittsburgh. We stand together with the American people in the face of this horrendous anti-Semitic brutality.”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

The hearts of his nation’s people are with the Jewish community, Trudeau said.

“May the families of those murdered be comforted, and may the injured recover quickly and fully,” he wrote on Twitter.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel

The people killed and wounded were victims of “blind anti-Semitic hate,” Merkel said.

“My sympathies are for the families; I wish for strength + recovery for the victims. We all must stand resolutely against anti-Semitism – everywhere,” she said, according to spokesman Steffen Seibert, who tweeted her comments in German.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres

In a statement, Guterres called anti-Semitism “a menace to democratic values and peace.”

“The Secretary-General calls for a united front – bringing together authorities at all levels, civil society, religious and community leaders and the public at large – to roll back the forces of racism, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and other forms of hatred, bigotry, discrimination and xenophobia gaining strength in many parts of the world,” he said.

First lady Melania Trump

The violence needs to stop and the people of the United States need to unite through God, the first lady said on Twitter.

“My heart breaks over the news out of #Pittsburgh,” she wrote.

Ivanka Trump

The President’s daughter and close adviser said Americans support Jews.

“America is stronger than the acts of a depraved bigot and anti-semite,” she tweeted. “All good Americans stand with the Jewish people to oppose acts of terror and share the horror, disgust & outrage over the massacre in Pittsburgh. We must unite against hated & evil. God bless those affected”

Nikki Haley, US Ambassador to the United Nations

The outgoing ambassador said her heart was breaking.

“An attack on the most sacred of places is the cruelest and most cowardly act a person can do,” she tweeted. “There is and will never be any tolerance for hate.”

CNN’s Melissa Gray and Delia Gallagher contributed to this report.