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Story highlights

Certain curry powder brands showed lead contamination

Raw beef and raw chicken may be infected with strains of salmonella

(CNN) —  

Be careful what you eat! A variety of foods, including curry powder, meats and poultry, have been recalled recently due to confirmed or possible contamination.

Curry powder may have an unwanted ‘kick’

Curry powder sold under the Baraka brand and several others has been recalled.
FDA
Curry powder sold under the Baraka brand and several others has been recalled.

UBC Food Distributors Inc. voluntarily recalled 7-ounce plastic containers of Baraka brand hot curry powder (UPC Code 822514265566) and curry powder (UPC Code 822514265535), according to the US Food and Drug Administration. This recall is due to a high level of lead found in these products by the Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development.

Cases of these products were shipped to Michigan, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Missouri and Colorado between June 15 and July 31.

Sirob Imports, Inc has also recalled 8-ounce and 16-ounce plastic containers of curry powder branded as Corrado, Orlando Imports, Nouri’s Syrian Bakery, Mediterranean Specialty Foods and Butera Fruit Market due to elevated levels of lead, according to the FDA. These products were distributed to Illinois, New Jersey and New York.

Eating these lead-contaminated products may elevate blood lead levels, the FDA explained. A toxic substance, lead is present in our environment in small amounts. In general, the small exposure to lead within the U.S. population does not pose a significant public health concern, according to the FDA.

However, large amounts of ingested lead can cause poisoning with symptoms of abdominal pain, vomiting, lethargy, weakness, behavior or mood changes, delirium, seizures and coma, the government agency noted. Children and infants are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, which can cause learning disabilities, developmental delays and lower IQ scores.

No safe level of lead ingestion has been identified for children, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which lists 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood as the danger point for a child.

Don’t be tempted to eat raw beef

A recall of raw beef products linked to a multistate outbreak of salmonella illness is ongoing.
CNN
A recall of raw beef products linked to a multistate outbreak of salmonella illness is ongoing.

Sixty-three additional cases of salmonella have been identified in an ongoing, multistate outbreak linked to raw beef products, the CDC reported Tuesday.

This brings the total number of people who have fallen ill to 120 in 22 states since August.

While no deaths have been reported, 33 people sickened in this outbreak have been hospitalized, according to the CDC.

The recalled products were sold nationwide under brand names Walmart, Cedar River Farms Natural Beef, Showcase, Showcase/Walmart and JBS Generic. The USDA inspection mark on the packaging of the recalled products contains the establishment number “EST. 267.”

Hawaii, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and Washington are the latest states to report illnesses as part of this outbreak. They join Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming, which all previously reported cases.

Those who are sick began experiencing symptoms between August 5 and September 28.

Symptoms of salmonella usually begin within 12 to 72 hours of consuming contaminated food. Symptoms can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever that last between four and seven days. Most people recover on their own, but those who experience persistent diarrhea may need to be hospitalized.

Chicken can cause sickness – preparation is key

Both raw and live chickens have caused salmonella infections.
Jupiterimages
Both raw and live chickens have caused salmonella infections.

A total of 92 people in 29 states have been infected with an outbreak strain of salmonella infantis linked to chicken products, the CDC reported last week. While no deaths have occurred, 21 people have been hospitalized.

Both live chickens as well as different types of raw chicken products have been contaminated, the CDC noted. Chicken products from a variety of sources have been contaminated, the government agency said. Since a single, common supplier has not yet been identified, this might indicate widespread contamination in the chicken industry, the CDC stated.

The outbreak strain is a type of salmonella commonly found in chickens and swine, and it can cause symptoms of diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever. Antibiotic resistance testing on bacteria isolated from ill people shows that the outbreak strain is resistant to multiple antibiotics. This means that anyone who develops a serious salmonella infection might be more difficult to treat with standard medicines.

Because salmonella infections can spread from one person to another, the CDC recommends washing hands before and after preparing or eating food, after contact with animals, and after using the restroom or changing diapers. To kill harmful germs, raw chicken should be cooked thoroughly to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit while leftovers should be reheated toteh same temperature, according to the CDC.

Ready-to-eat meat and poultry products could lead to food poisoning

Trader Joe's is among the retailers that recalled ready-to-eat products.
CNN
Trader Joe's is among the retailers that recalled ready-to-eat products.

Bakkavor Foods USA Inc. recalled about 795,261 pounds of ready-to-eat meat and poultry products containing an onion ingredient that may be contaminated with salmonella and listeria monocytogenes, the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced Sunday.

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