Pro-EU demonstrators wave an mixed EU and Union flag as they protest against Brexit, outside of the Houses of Parliament in central London on June 11, 2018. - After a rollercoaster week of Brexit rows within her government and with Brussels, British Prime Minister Theresa May will on Tuesday seek to avoid another setback in a long-awaited showdown with parliament. MPs in the House of Commons will vote on a string of amendments to a key piece of Brexit legislation that could force the government's hand in the negotiations with the European Union. (Photo by Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS / AFP)        (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Pro-EU demonstrators wave an mixed EU and Union flag as they protest against Brexit, outside of the Houses of Parliament in central London on June 11, 2018. - After a rollercoaster week of Brexit rows within her government and with Brussels, British Prime Minister Theresa May will on Tuesday seek to avoid another setback in a long-awaited showdown with parliament. MPs in the House of Commons will vote on a string of amendments to a key piece of Brexit legislation that could force the government's hand in the negotiations with the European Union. (Photo by Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS / AFP) (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
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(CNN Business) —  

Royal Bank of Scotland has taken a £100 million earnings hit over Brexit, making it the first major lender to acknowledge costs related to the divorce.

The bank said Friday that it took action because of the “more uncertain economic outlook.” Analysts said the move was designed to account for loans that may go bad following Brexit.

“The risk of a disorderly Brexit has increased. We are not where we had wanted to be as a nation at this stage of the year,” Katie Murray, the bank’s interim chief financial officer, said during a conference call with investors.

Shares in RBS (RBS) dropped over 4% following the release of its quarterly earnings. Other UK banks such as Lloyds (LYG) and Barclays (BCS) did not set aside money for Brexit when reporting earnings this week.

The United Kingdom is scheduled to leave the European Union on March 29, 2019. But companies are still in the dark about what that means for their ability to do business across the new border.

For some banks, the question is whether they will be allowed to continue trading across the European Union and in the United Kingdom without new barriers.

Some banks have established branches elsewhere in the European Union, and are planning to move thousands of jobs out of London to safeguard their businesses.

RBS previously announced plans to beef up its presence in the European Union, and it has leased office space in Amsterdam.

The decision by RBS to set aside £100 million ($128 million) highlights another risk: A messy departure from the European Union would greatly harm the UK economy and prevent some customers from repaying loans.

“It is an early acknowledgment of the difficulties that customers are expected to make in the aftermath of Brexit — particularly in a no deal scenario — and that number could rise,” said Craig Erlam, an analyst at online currency trading firm Oanda.