CHICAGO, IL - DECEMBER 17:  A machine prints a Mega Millions lottery ticket for a customer at a convenience store on December 17, 2013 in Chicago, Illinois. The jackpot is currently the second largest in U.S. history.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
CHICAGO, IL - DECEMBER 17: A machine prints a Mega Millions lottery ticket for a customer at a convenience store on December 17, 2013 in Chicago, Illinois. The jackpot is currently the second largest in U.S. history. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:31
History of the lottery
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 12: U.S. President Donald Trump departs on the South Lawn of the White House, on December 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump is traveling to the Army versus Navy Football Game at the United States Military Academy in West Point, NY. (Photo by Al Drago/Getty Images)
Al Drago/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 12: U.S. President Donald Trump departs on the South Lawn of the White House, on December 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump is traveling to the Army versus Navy Football Game at the United States Military Academy in West Point, NY. (Photo by Al Drago/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:18
Trump said electing Biden would crash the markets. It didn't
CNN
Now playing
03:22
Bank of America CEO reveals his top worry about the economy
A 'we are hiring sign' in front of the Buya restaurant on March 05, 2021 in Miami, Florida. The restaurant is looking to hire more workers as the U.S. unemployment rate drops to 6.2 percent, as many restaurants and bars reopen. Officials credit the job growth to declining new COVID-19 cases and broadening vaccine immunization that has helped more businesses reopen with greater capacity. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
A 'we are hiring sign' in front of the Buya restaurant on March 05, 2021 in Miami, Florida. The restaurant is looking to hire more workers as the U.S. unemployment rate drops to 6.2 percent, as many restaurants and bars reopen. Officials credit the job growth to declining new COVID-19 cases and broadening vaccine immunization that has helped more businesses reopen with greater capacity. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:27
Jobs and retail data show positive signs for the economy
Now playing
03:21
Teachers under pandemic stress are quitting: I didn't feel safe
Barbers from King's Cutz give haircuts indoors while observing COVID-19 safety restrictions on March 13, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.
Mario Tama/Getty Images
Barbers from King's Cutz give haircuts indoors while observing COVID-19 safety restrictions on March 13, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.
Now playing
01:43
US consumer prices increased in March
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 01: Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell testifies during a Senate Banking Committee hearing about the quarterly CARES Act report on Capitol Hill December 1, 2020 in Washington, DC.  Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin also testified at the hearing. (Photo by Susan Walsh-Pool/Getty Images)
Susan Walsh/Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 01: Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell testifies during a Senate Banking Committee hearing about the quarterly CARES Act report on Capitol Hill December 1, 2020 in Washington, DC. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin also testified at the hearing. (Photo by Susan Walsh-Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:06
Fed chief: The economy is about to grow more quickly
marketplace africa nigeria cotton exports farmers spc_00002226.png
marketplace africa nigeria cotton exports farmers spc_00002226.png
Now playing
04:57
How international demand for Nigerian cotton is suiting well for small farmers
marketplace africa fintech flutterwave valuation african innovation spc_00040411.png
marketplace africa fintech flutterwave valuation african innovation spc_00040411.png
Now playing
04:49
How Flutterwave's unicorn status could sprout more innovation in African fintech
Motor vehicle traffic moves along the Interstate 76 highway in Philadelphia, Wednesday, March 31, 2021. Looking beyond the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill, President Joe Biden and lawmakers are laying the groundwork for another of his top legislative priorities — a long-sought boost to the nation's roads, bridges and other infrastructure that could meet GOP resistance to a hefty price tag. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Matt Rourke/AP
Motor vehicle traffic moves along the Interstate 76 highway in Philadelphia, Wednesday, March 31, 2021. Looking beyond the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill, President Joe Biden and lawmakers are laying the groundwork for another of his top legislative priorities — a long-sought boost to the nation's roads, bridges and other infrastructure that could meet GOP resistance to a hefty price tag. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Now playing
00:49
Levi's CEO on corporate tax: 28% pushes the threshold
Now playing
03:01
A return to the office brings 'some anxieties, some anticipation'
Traffic flows past the Main Street Train Station on the Interstate 95 bridge through downtown Richmond, Va., Wednesday, March 31, 2021.  Looking beyond the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill, President Joe Biden and lawmakers are laying the groundwork for another of his top legislative priorities — a long-sought boost to the nation's roads, bridges and other infrastructure that could meet GOP resistance to a hefty price tag. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Steve Helber/AP
Traffic flows past the Main Street Train Station on the Interstate 95 bridge through downtown Richmond, Va., Wednesday, March 31, 2021. Looking beyond the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill, President Joe Biden and lawmakers are laying the groundwork for another of his top legislative priorities — a long-sought boost to the nation's roads, bridges and other infrastructure that could meet GOP resistance to a hefty price tag. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Now playing
01:31
Lyft co-founder: Higher corporate tax to fund infrastructure 'makes sense'
People shop in the historic Charleston City Market, South Carolina on April 4, 2021 amid the Covid-19 pandemic. (Photo by Daniel SLIM / AFP) (Photo by DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images)
DANIEL SLIM/AFP/Getty Images
People shop in the historic Charleston City Market, South Carolina on April 4, 2021 amid the Covid-19 pandemic. (Photo by Daniel SLIM / AFP) (Photo by DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
03:08
IMF upgrades 2021 economic outlook
Construction workers build the "Signature Bridge," replacing and improving a busy highway intersection at I-95 and I-395 on March 17, 2021 in Miami, Florida. The Florida Department of Transportation is building the project in partnership with the Miami-Dade Expressway Authority and its contractor, the Archer Western-de Moya Group Joint Venture. The infrastructure project will ease traffic congestion, connect communities with downtown neighborhoods, and provide an iconic bridge for Miami's skyline. The entire project is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2024 at the cost of $818 million. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Construction workers build the "Signature Bridge," replacing and improving a busy highway intersection at I-95 and I-395 on March 17, 2021 in Miami, Florida. The Florida Department of Transportation is building the project in partnership with the Miami-Dade Expressway Authority and its contractor, the Archer Western-de Moya Group Joint Venture. The infrastructure project will ease traffic congestion, connect communities with downtown neighborhoods, and provide an iconic bridge for Miami's skyline. The entire project is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2024 at the cost of $818 million. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:47
US economy added 916,000 jobs in March
Resturant Yurkevcih Pkg 1
CNN
Resturant Yurkevcih Pkg 1
Now playing
02:55
Restaurants are still struggling, but see hope on the horizon
Now playing
03:41
Fed's James Bullard: We'll let inflation run above target for some time
(CNN) —  

So you’re ready to win the Powerball and Mega Millions?

You have a better chance of being struck by lightning and bitten by a shark simultaneously, but reality’s a bummer. It’s more fun to fancy oneself doing the Scrooge McDuck in a vault full of gold coins.

Fortunately, there’s time to prepare yourself for this historic windfall. After both the major lotteries rolled over, the kitties now stand at $1.6 b-b-b-billion, with a B, for Mega Millions and $620 million for Powerball. New numbers will be drawn Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively.

You have to win, right? (No.) You’ve been playing for years; surely it’s your time. (Eh.) You deserve this! (Maybe that’s true.)

Here are a few guideposts for handling your newfound fortune:

Make sure that thing is signed

Did you put your John Hancock on it? If not, bad move. Imagine winning and you go look for your ticket and it’s gone.

00:36 - Source: HLN
31 Canadian workers just won $60 million

Then your shiftless roommate – who can’t put his cereal bowl in the sink, let alone get to the store to stand in line for lottery tickets – shows up a few days later in a Bugatti Chiron.

Yup.

Sign that bad boy. Like, now. Then take a selfie with it.

Play nice with others

Are you in a work pool with five or 50 other people? Well, as nice as it is to trust your pals and co-workers, relationships have crumbled over much, much less than a nine-digit payday.

You could be worth 0.82 Taylor Swifts

Picture this: Chet, who’s been collecting the office’s lottery contributions for time immemorial, doesn’t show up to work Thursday. You call to find him on Necker Island, which he just purchased from Richard Branson.

A woman fills out a Mega Millions lottery ticket in New York  on Friday.
ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images
A woman fills out a Mega Millions lottery ticket in New York on Friday.

Turns out, Chet won the lottery. Doesn’t that mean that you won the lottery, too? Well, no, Chet explains. He bought the office’s tickets on a different trip to the Shop ‘n’ Save. The winning ticket, he says, was purchased when he went to the Shop ‘n’ Save to purchase tickets for himself.

“That’s preposterous! Do you have proof, Chet? … Chet? … Hello?”

Good luck getting to Necker Island.

If you’re an office pool member, make sure Chet sets everyone up with photocopies of the pool tickets, or that he posts them somewhere that everyone can see them. It’ll mean you’re keeping Chet in check – not that anyone has reason to doubt Chet, but just in case – and it’s more fun for you as you can giddily check the numbers yourself.

Prepare to take a hit

You won! Congrats! You’ve defied truly astonishing odds. Truly.

Now how would you like your millions? In a lump sum or doled out over time?

01:29 - Source: CNNMoney
Longer odds for Mega Millions win

If you choose the former, expect to get $354 million for Powerball or $904 million for Mega Millions. Sorry, you won’t quite make the Billionaires’ Club. Bill Gates sends his regrets.

But what if you have the patience of Job and are content to maximize the payout by collecting checks over time? Sadly, you still won’t be a billionaire. It’ll take you almost 30 years to get all that money, and because you’re now in the same tax bracket as Mr. Gates, the federal government will come looking for 37% of your loot.

In some states without income tax or with special rules for lottery winners, the blow will be softer, but Uncle Sam will always want his money. Hop over to USAMega.com to see the rules where you live.

Shut up. Really. Just hush.

Do not – repeat: DO NOT – go running down the street waving the ticket above your head, singing, “I’m in the money, I’m in the money!” You’re rich now. You’re going to need a much cooler head.

After you get your signed ticket to a safe or safe deposit box – for the latter, might we suggest taking some beefy hired muscle along? – you’ll need to get your Scrooge McDucks in a row.

01:22 - Source: CNN
What happens when you win the lottery?

You might want a new phone number and email address. It might even be worthwhile to take off to Belize for a week or three until the pesky media loses interest. You’re likely going to be publicly identified, so your chances of avoiding that call from your moochy Uncle Jasper are out the window.

Only a handful of states – Delaware, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, North Dakota, Ohio, South Carolina and Texas, among them – permit you to remain nameless. In Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont, you can set up a trust before collecting a prize and send a lawyer to pick it up for you.

Don’t know how to set up a trust? Don’t worry, Daddy Fat Stacks, you’ll soon have people for that.

Speaking of people…

Leaders delegate, the old saying goes. As do the obscenely wealthy. You may have an eye on that Seychelles waterfront villa or that 80-meter yacht, the one with the helicopter pad, but cool your (private?) jets for a minute.

You are in no hurry to make these decisions. Depending on your state, you will have between 180 days and a year to pick up your oversized check, so first things first.

00:48 - Source: HLN
Glitch generates false lottery winners

You need good people, people you trust, to help you manage your money. Sure, your cousin, Sheila, might be a whiz with numbers, but it’s best to have someone a little more dispassionate.

Take your time, do some research and find a reputable lawyer and a certified financial planner, pronto. Then, you’ll want to hire specialists who can handle your taxes and estate planning. You’ll feel much better with a skilled team watching over your interests.

Got all that in order? Then you’re set. Have fun on that yacht.