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Crime scene tape surrounds the Mandalay Hotel (background) after a gunman killed at least 50 people and wounded more than 200 others when he opened fire on a country music concert in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 2, 2017. 
Police said the gunman, a 64-year-old local resident named as Stephen Paddock, had been killed after a SWAT team responded to reports of multiple gunfire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay, a hotel-casino next to the concert venue. / AFP PHOTO / Mark RALSTON        (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images
Crime scene tape surrounds the Mandalay Hotel (background) after a gunman killed at least 50 people and wounded more than 200 others when he opened fire on a country music concert in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 2, 2017. Police said the gunman, a 64-year-old local resident named as Stephen Paddock, had been killed after a SWAT team responded to reports of multiple gunfire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay, a hotel-casino next to the concert venue. / AFP PHOTO / Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
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(CNN) -- In the early days of the investigation into the Las Vegas mass shooting, two people were named as persons of interest in the case, according to newly released police search warrants.        One was deceased shooter Stephen Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, who has since been publicly cleared in the case. The name of the other was redacted in hundreds of pages of documents released Tuesday to the media.        The Las Vegas Review-Journal has identified that individual as Douglas Haig. Haig did not respond to phone calls Tuesday evening.
PHOTO: KNXV
(CNN) -- In the early days of the investigation into the Las Vegas mass shooting, two people were named as persons of interest in the case, according to newly released police search warrants. One was deceased shooter Stephen Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, who has since been publicly cleared in the case. The name of the other was redacted in hundreds of pages of documents released Tuesday to the media. The Las Vegas Review-Journal has identified that individual as Douglas Haig. Haig did not respond to phone calls Tuesday evening.
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PHOTO: CNN
NS Slug: VEGAS SHOOTING:SHERIFF-NO RADICAL IDEOLOGY FOUND Synopsis: Sheriff: Las Vegas shooter didn't leave behind suicide note or manifesto Keywords: NEVADA LAS VEGAS SHOOTING JUSTICE LEGAL
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This undated photo provided by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows Marilou Danley. Danley, 62, returned to the United States from the Philippines on Tuesday night, Oct. 3, 2017, and was met at Los Angeles International Airport by FBI agents, according to a law enforcement official. Authorities are trying to determine why Stephen Paddock, Danley's boyfriend, killed dozens of people in Las Vegas Oct. 1, in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department via AP, File)
PHOTO: Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department via AP
This undated photo provided by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department shows Marilou Danley. Danley, 62, returned to the United States from the Philippines on Tuesday night, Oct. 3, 2017, and was met at Los Angeles International Airport by FBI agents, according to a law enforcement official. Authorities are trying to determine why Stephen Paddock, Danley's boyfriend, killed dozens of people in Las Vegas Oct. 1, in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department via AP, File)
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Crime scene tape surrounds the Mandalay Hotel (background) after a gunman killed at least 50 people and wounded more than 200 others when he opened fire on a country music concert in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 2, 2017. 
Police said the gunman, a 64-year-old local resident named as Stephen Paddock, had been killed after a SWAT team responded to reports of multiple gunfire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay, a hotel-casino next to the concert venue. / AFP PHOTO / Mark RALSTON        (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images
Crime scene tape surrounds the Mandalay Hotel (background) after a gunman killed at least 50 people and wounded more than 200 others when he opened fire on a country music concert in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 2, 2017. Police said the gunman, a 64-year-old local resident named as Stephen Paddock, had been killed after a SWAT team responded to reports of multiple gunfire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay, a hotel-casino next to the concert venue. / AFP PHOTO / Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
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LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 02:  A cowboy hat lays in the street after shots were fired near a country music festival on October 1, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. A gunman has opened fire on a music festival in Las Vegas, leaving at least 20 people dead and more than 100 injured. Police have confirmed that one suspect has been shot. The investigation is ongoing. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
PHOTO: David Becker/Getty Images
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 02: A cowboy hat lays in the street after shots were fired near a country music festival on October 1, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. A gunman has opened fire on a music festival in Las Vegas, leaving at least 20 people dead and more than 100 injured. Police have confirmed that one suspect has been shot. The investigation is ongoing. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
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LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 02:  An injured person is tended to in the intersection of Tropicana Ave. and Las Vegas Boulevard after a mass shooting at a country music festival nearby on October 2, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. A gunman has opened fire on a music festival in Las Vegas, killing over 20 people. Police have confirmed that one suspect has been shot dead. The investigation is ongoing. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Ethan Miller/Getty Images
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 02: An injured person is tended to in the intersection of Tropicana Ave. and Las Vegas Boulevard after a mass shooting at a country music festival nearby on October 2, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. A gunman has opened fire on a music festival in Las Vegas, killing over 20 people. Police have confirmed that one suspect has been shot dead. The investigation is ongoing. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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(CNN) —  

President Donald Trump suggested Monday, one year after the Las Vegas massacre, that bump-fire stocks would be banned “over the next couple of weeks.”

Trump was asked at a Rose Garden news conference about the progress of regulations to eliminate the devices, which allow semi-automatic weapons to fire at a more rapid rate.

“In order to eliminate – terminate – bump stocks, we have to go through procedure. We are now at the final stages of that procedure,” he said.

“We are knocking out bump stocks. I have told the (National Rifle Association) – bump stocks are gone. But to do that, you have to go to public hearings, which we have had. You have to go through all sorts of regulatory control systems.”

Trump added that the process should be wrapped up in “two or three weeks.”

Last week, just before the one-year anniversary of the Las Vegas shooting, which claimed 58 lives, the federal government took the next step in its efforts to ban bump stocks.

On September 27, the Justice Department formally submitted its proposed final rule, “Bump-Stock-Type Devices” to the Office of Management and Budget at the White House, according to a DOJ official.

This submission initiated OMB’s 90-day review period of the rule, so the process is still underway.

In March, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the Justice Department would clarify rules that define bump stocks within the definition of “machine gun” under federal law, a move that would ban the sale of such accessories.

The public comment period for the change in the bump stock rule ended on June 27.

Trump also said Monday that his administration is working with Congress “on both sides” on “a lot of different things” regarding gun legislation.

It’s unclear what Trump was referring to. Both Democratic and Republican lawmakers agreed after the Las Vegas shooting that the response should be to ban the sale of bump stocks, but so far, they have made no progress on concrete legislation to outlaw them. There had been some disagreement over whether Congress had the authority to ban the devices or whether it was up to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who has been behind a lot of gun control proposals in the Senate, introduced a bill to ban bump stocks but eventually Trump moved for the Justice Department to ban the device.

In general, Congress has been reluctant to take up additional measures to curb gun violence. In March, Congress included a provision that incentivizes state and federal authorities to report more data to the country’s gun background check system into a $1.3 trillion budget, but other efforts aimed at gun control have gone nowhere on Capitol Hill.

CNN’s Daniella Diaz contributed to this report.