Christine Blasey Ford swears in at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for her to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
Christine Blasey Ford swears in at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for her to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
PHOTO: Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
Now playing
03:46
In 4 hours of testimony, Ford stuck to her story
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27:  Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) shouts while questioning Judge Brett Kavanaugh during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) shouts while questioning Judge Brett Kavanaugh during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Pool/Getty Images
Now playing
04:26
Lindsey Graham erupts during Kavanaugh hearing
Supreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 27, 2018. - University professor Christine Blasey Ford, 51, told a tense Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that could make or break Kavanaugh
Supreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 27, 2018. - University professor Christine Blasey Ford, 51, told a tense Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that could make or break Kavanaugh's nomination she was "100 percent" certain he was the assailant and it was "absolutely not" a case of mistaken identify. (Photo by Gabriella Demczuk / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read GABRIELLA DEMCZUK/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: GABRIELLA DEMCZUK/Pool/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
02:30
Kavanaugh asked about Fox News interview
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 on Capitol Hill in Washington.  (Win McNamee/Pool Image via AP)
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Win McNamee/Pool Image via AP)
PHOTO: Win McNamee/POOL/AP
Now playing
05:03
Durbin to Kavanaugh: Would you want FBI probe?
Christine Blasey Ford swears in at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for her to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
Christine Blasey Ford swears in at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for her to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
PHOTO: Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
Now playing
03:46
In 4 hours of testimony, Ford stuck to her story
Lindsey Graham 09272018
Lindsey Graham 09272018
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:32
Graham on hearing: I feel ambushed
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 27, 2018. - Kavanaugh was to testify in front of the panel next on Thursday afternoon, having stridently rejected the allegations of sexual abuse by Blasey Ford and two other women in prepared remarks. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / POOL / AFP)        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 27, 2018. - Kavanaugh was to testify in front of the panel next on Thursday afternoon, having stridently rejected the allegations of sexual abuse by Blasey Ford and two other women in prepared remarks. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: SAUL LOEB/Pool/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
01:01
Kavanaugh: This is an orchestrated political hit
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
00:48
Kavanaugh gets emotional during hearing
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh arrives to testify before the US Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 27, 2018. - Kavanaugh was to testify in front of the panel next on Thursday afternoon, having stridently rejected the allegations of sexual abuse by Blasey Ford and two other women in prepared remarks. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / POOL / AFP)        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh arrives to testify before the US Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 27, 2018. - Kavanaugh was to testify in front of the panel next on Thursday afternoon, having stridently rejected the allegations of sexual abuse by Blasey Ford and two other women in prepared remarks. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
02:51
Kavanaugh: This is a national disgrace
Brett Kavanaugh speaks at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on September 27, 2018. (Photo by MICHAEL REYNOLDS / POOL / AFP)        (Photo credit should read MICHAEL REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Brett Kavanaugh speaks at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on September 27, 2018. (Photo by MICHAEL REYNOLDS / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read MICHAEL REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: MICHAEL REYNOLDS/Pool/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
00:58
Kavanaugh: I've never sexually assaulted anyone
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 14: Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) speaks at a tax reform hearing before the Senate Finance Committee on Capitol Hill September 14, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump has indicated that tax reform should be a major legislative goal this fall. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 14: Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) speaks at a tax reform hearing before the Senate Finance Committee on Capitol Hill September 14, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump has indicated that tax reform should be a major legislative goal this fall. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images
Now playing
01:05
GOP Sen. Hatch: Ford is attractive and nice
PHOTO: pool
Now playing
00:57
The detail Blasey Ford remembers the most
Blumenthal Ford hearing
Blumenthal Ford hearing
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:16
Blumenthal to Ford: Should Judge be interviewed?
Now playing
02:58
Kavanaugh accuser gives vivid details of alleged assault
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:19
Christine Blasey Ford chokes up: I'm terrified
Now playing
01:08
Senator interrupts Feinstein during her statement
(CNN) —  

Two red state Democrats facing re-election in 2018 announced on Friday that they oppose Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court.

Sens. Joe Donnelly of Indiana and Jon Tester of Montana both came out against President Donald Trump’s nominee the day after Christine Blasey Ford testified that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in the early 1980s – allegations that Kavanaugh vehemently denied.

“I have deep reservations about Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination to this lifetime position and … we have been unable to get all the information necessary regarding this nomination, despite my best efforts,” Donnelly said in a statement on Friday.

“While I would gladly welcome the opportunity to work with President Trump on a new nominee for this critically important position, if Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination comes before the full Senate for a vote under these circumstances, I will oppose it,” he said.

Tester put out a statement later in the day on Friday, citing a number of concerns with Kavanaugh’s record as well as concerns over the allegations of sexual assault.

“I have concerns that Judge Kavanaugh defended the PATRIOT Act instead of Montanans’ privacy,” the senator said. “I have concerns about his support for more dark money in politics. I have concerns about who he believes is in charge of making personal health decisions. And I have deep concerns about the allegations of sexual assault against Judge Kavanaugh. Unfortunately, Judge Kavanaugh couldn’t find time to discuss these concerns with me in person, so the only information I have is from what he said in his hearings. I’ll be voting against him.”

Donnelly was one of three Democrats in the chamber to back President Donald Trump’s first Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, and he had been an a handful of undecided senators from red or purple states that Kavanaugh’s supporters had targeted for support.

The news makes the battle for Senate Republicans to confirm Trump’s nominee harder given the GOP’s razor-thin majority in the upper chamber. Republicans can only afford to lose one GOP vote if all Senate Democrats opt to vote against the nomination, and many congressional observers are closely watching a pair of undecided moderate Republicans, Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, to determine the future of Kavanaugh’s nomination.