Kate McClure helped raise more than $280,000 for Johnny Bobbitt Jr., a homeless man, to repay him
PHOTO: GoFundMe
Kate McClure helped raise more than $280,000 for Johnny Bobbitt Jr., a homeless man, to repay him
Now playing
02:45
Judge to couple: Give raised funds to veteran
Now playing
03:24
Massive homeless encampment stirs debate
RVs, like Sharhonda Beavers
PHOTO: Dan Simon/CNN
RVs, like Sharhonda Beavers', are a common site in many California cities, including San Francisco.
Now playing
02:57
'Safe' parking lots give California homeless a lifeline
miami dade officers help homeless family btc pkg valencia_00021825.jpg
miami dade officers help homeless family btc pkg valencia_00021825.jpg
Now playing
02:23
Miami-Dade officers help homeless family
The first meeting in Koreatown. Pleasants noticed the Yale logo on Hershman
PHOTO: Kim Hershman
The first meeting in Koreatown. Pleasants noticed the Yale logo on Hershman's hat.
Now playing
02:36
Fellow alum reaches out to help homeless Yale graduate
austin homelessness pkg 01
PHOTO: CNN
austin homelessness pkg 01
Now playing
03:07
Advocate for homeless residents: It's political theater
LGBT homeless youth are over-represented in cities across the US, but 25-year-old Gabriel Rondon is finding a way out of that statistic by learning to cook.
PHOTO: CNN/Gabe Ramirez
LGBT homeless youth are over-represented in cities across the US, but 25-year-old Gabriel Rondon is finding a way out of that statistic by learning to cook.
Now playing
02:56
A path out of homelessness: Learning the art of cooking
America
America's homeless crisis: Skid Row resident tells his story_00003216.jpg
Now playing
04:24
America's homeless crisis: Skid Row resident tells his story
homeless man reunites with family
PHOTO: News 12 New Jersey
homeless man reunites with family
Now playing
01:18
Homeless man reunites with daughters after 24 years
Belongings of the homeless crowd a downtown Los Angeles sidewalk in Skid Row on May 30, 2019. - The city of Los Angeles on May 29 agreed to allow homeless people on Skid Row to keep their property and not have it seized, providing the items are not bulky or hazardous. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP)        (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images
Belongings of the homeless crowd a downtown Los Angeles sidewalk in Skid Row on May 30, 2019. - The city of Los Angeles on May 29 agreed to allow homeless people on Skid Row to keep their property and not have it seized, providing the items are not bulky or hazardous. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP) (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:45
Streets full of tents: The other side of L.A.
David Casarez
PHOTO: Jasmine Scofield/Twitter
David Casarez
Now playing
00:32
Homeless man lands software engineering job
PHOTO: Tupac Mosley
Now playing
01:39
Homeless valedictorian earns $3 million in scholarships
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
04:49
Offering homeless people a lifeline
Richard Jenkins
PHOTO: Delaney Newhart for Girard College
Richard Jenkins
Now playing
02:18
Before Harvard, he was homeless
homeless veterans tiny homes orig nh nws_00003810.jpg
homeless veterans tiny homes orig nh nws_00003810.jpg
Now playing
01:23
Tiny homes for homeless veterans
#JoggerJoe video but coming from Facebook  title:  duration: 00:00:00 site:  author:  published:  intervention: yes description:
PHOTO: JJ Harris
#JoggerJoe video but coming from Facebook title: duration: 00:00:00 site: author: published: intervention: yes description:
Now playing
01:11
Jogger throws homeless man's stuff away
(CNN) —  

After Johnny Bobbitt Jr., a homeless man with just $20 in his pocket, gave stranded motorist Kate McClure the money for gas last October, the woman and her boyfriend raised $400,000 to help him out.

But the feel-good viral story recently devolved into a feud over how much money Bobbitt had yet to see.

The case went to a New Jersey court on Thursday, where a judge ruled the couple needs to provide a full accounting of where the money has gone and said until then the remaining money needs to be turned over to Bobbitt’s legal team and kept in a trust.

Bobbitt lawyer Chris Fallon told CNN that as of late Friday evening – hours after the money was expected to arrive – he had not received the balance.

According to CNN affiliates WPVI and KYW, McClure and Mark D’Amico had the money they raised on GoFundMe in their personal accounts, Bobbitt’s lawyer said.

The two sides differed as to how much had been disbursed. McClure’s and D’Amico’s attorney said they had provided Bobbitt with more than $200,000, WPVI and KYW reported. Fallon said the amount was about $75,000.

CNN called Ernest Badway, an attorney for the couple, who said he had no comment. In court he told the judge the couple “have said they will have a forensic accountant. They have said they are fine with the trustee. They have said they will open up the books. What more can they do?”

He urged the public to withhold judgment until the accounting of the money was finished.

The judge wants that done by September 10, WPVI reported.

KYW reported the judge ordered the remaining money put in trust on Friday.

“What I would say to those people is thank you for your generosity,” Fallon said outside court, “and we’ll work hard to make sure that that money gets spent the way you all wanted it spent.”

Some of the money went to GoFundme administrative fees.

In an interview earlier this week with The Philadelphia Inquirer, McClure said she and D’Amico did what they could to help Bobbitt, who has a drug addiction, according to Fallon. The couple told the newspaper they gave Bobbitt more than half the money but were withholding the rest until he gets a job and is drug-free.

CNN’s Kwegyirba Croffie and Tony Marco contributed to this report.