Now playing
03:11
Hear Supreme Court arguments about cakeshop
WASHINGTON - FEBRUARY 05:  The U.S. Supreme Court is shown February 5, 2009 in Washington, DC. It was announced today that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had surgery after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Getty Images
WASHINGTON - FEBRUARY 05: The U.S. Supreme Court is shown February 5, 2009 in Washington, DC. It was announced today that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had surgery after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:32
SCOTUS: States can force tax on online shoppers
Jack Phillips Today Show
PHOTO: NBC
Jack Phillips Today Show
Now playing
02:18
Colorado baker: I couldn't create this cake
A wedding cake with statuettes of two men is seen during the demonstration in West Hollywood, California, May 15, 2008, after the decision by the California Supreme Court to effectively greenlight same-sex marriage. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
A wedding cake with statuettes of two men is seen during the demonstration in West Hollywood, California, May 15, 2008, after the decision by the California Supreme Court to effectively greenlight same-sex marriage. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:04
SCOTUS rules for baker in same-sex cake case
People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court, on April 23, 2018 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court, on April 23, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:44
SCOTUS wipes away lower court ruling
how the supreme court picks cases_00000000.jpg
how the supreme court picks cases_00000000.jpg
Now playing
01:39
How the Supreme Court picks its cases
Now playing
01:31
Supreme Court allows parts of travel ban
WASHINGTON - JUNE 25: The exterior view of the U.S. Supreme Court is seen June 25, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court has ruled to give more freedom for interest groups and unions to run TV ads before elections, and also ruled to limit taxpayers' rights to challenge government initiatives as unconstitutionally promoting religion. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
PHOTO: File/Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON - JUNE 25: The exterior view of the U.S. Supreme Court is seen June 25, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court has ruled to give more freedom for interest groups and unions to run TV ads before elections, and also ruled to limit taxpayers' rights to challenge government initiatives as unconstitutionally promoting religion. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:05
Supreme Court throws out NC redistricting maps
Pro-choice activist, Alissa Manzoeillo, of Washington, D.C. waits for rulings in front of the U.S. Supreme Court  on June 27, 2016 in Washington, DC. A ruling is expected in Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, a Texas case the places restrictions on abortion clinics, as well as rulings in the former Virginia Governor's corruption case and a gun rights case.
PHOTO: Pete Marovich/Getty Images
Pro-choice activist, Alissa Manzoeillo, of Washington, D.C. waits for rulings in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016 in Washington, DC. A ruling is expected in Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, a Texas case the places restrictions on abortion clinics, as well as rulings in the former Virginia Governor's corruption case and a gun rights case.
Now playing
01:25
Supreme Court rules on Texas abortion law
Obama Supreme Court immigration ruling_00000000.jpg
Obama Supreme Court immigration ruling_00000000.jpg
Now playing
01:16
Obama responds to immigration ruling
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown as the court meets to issue decisions May 23, 2016 in Washington, D.C.
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Getty Images
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown as the court meets to issue decisions May 23, 2016 in Washington, D.C.
Now playing
01:11
Supreme Court upholds affirmative action at university
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 25: A gay marriage waves a flag in front of the Supreme Court Building June 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court is expected rule in the next few days on whether states can prohibit same sex marriage, as 13 states currently do. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 25: A gay marriage waves a flag in front of the Supreme Court Building June 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court is expected rule in the next few days on whether states can prohibit same sex marriage, as 13 states currently do. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:36
GOP hopefuls denounce marriage ruling
The Justices of the US Supreme Court sit for their official photograph on October 8, 2010 at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. Front row (L-R): Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Back Row (L-R): Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. and Associate Justice Elena Kagan. AFP PHOTO / TIM SLOAN (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images
The Justices of the US Supreme Court sit for their official photograph on October 8, 2010 at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. Front row (L-R): Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Back Row (L-R): Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. and Associate Justice Elena Kagan. AFP PHOTO / TIM SLOAN (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:21
Supreme Court rules on EPA emissions limits
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown March 29, 2016 in Washington, DC following the first 4-4 tie in a case before the court.
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Getty Images
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown March 29, 2016 in Washington, DC following the first 4-4 tie in a case before the court.
Now playing
01:09
Supreme Court rules 7-1 in favor of death row inmate
A general view of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)Supreme Court building exterior
PHOTO: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images
A general view of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)Supreme Court building exterior
Now playing
01:37
Supreme Court rules in favor of lethal injection drug
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 26: The exterior of the U.S. Supreme Court on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 26: The exterior of the U.S. Supreme Court on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:14
Supreme Court rules on congressional districting
(CNN) —  

The Colorado baker who became a national figure after he refused to bake a custom cake to celebrate the marriage of a same-sex couple due to a religious objection and won at the Supreme Court is wading into another legal battle.

In a lawsuit against Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper filed on Tuesday in the US District Court for the District of Colorado, Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips claims that the state “has been on a crusade to crush” him because state officials “despise what he believes and how he practices his faith.”

“This lawsuit is necessary to stop Colorado’s continuing persecution of Phillips,” it says.

The complaint alleges that not long after Phillips’ Supreme Court victory, the state of Colorado informed the baker that he had violated state law by refusing to create a cake with a blue and pink design requested by a Colorado attorney to “celebrate a gender transition.”

In addition to suing Hickenlooper, Phillips is suing the director of the Colorado Civil Rights Division, members of the Colorado Civil Rights Commission and the state’s attorney general.

The lawsuit says Phillips “serves all people, but will not create cakes that express messages or celebrate events contrary to his religious beliefs.”

“The state’s continuing efforts to target Phillips do not just violate the Constitution; they cross the line into bad faith. This Court should put a stop to Colorado’s unconstitutional bullying,” the lawsuit further says.

In June, the Supreme Court held that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission had showed hostility toward Phillips based on his religious beliefs. The ruling was a win for the baker, who had cited his beliefs as a Christian, but it left unsettled broader constitutional questions on religious liberty.

According to the new lawsuit, “Phillips declined to create the cake … because it would have celebrated messages contrary to his religious belief that sex – the status of being male or female – is given by God, is biologically determined, is not determined by perceptions or feelings, and cannot be chosen or changed.”

It goes on to say, “It is now clear that Colorado will not rest until Phillips either closes Masterpiece Cakeshop or agrees to violate his religious beliefs.”

Phillips is asking the court for relief, including “an award of punitive damages” totaling $100,000 against the director of the Colorado Civil Rights Division for what the lawsuit describes as the defendant’s alleged “unconstitutional actions.”

CNN has reached out to Phillips, his attorney and Hickenlooper for comment.

The Colorado Attorney General’s Office declined to comment to CNN on the lawsuit.

Rebecca Laurie, the spokesperson for the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies, told CNN that the Colorado Civil Rights Division and the Colorado Civil Rights Commission are unable to comment regarding pending or active litigation.

CNN’s Ariane de Vogue contributed to this report.