A sunflower with dried leaves is seen near Perly-Certoux, Switzerland, on Monday, August 6.
Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

The fingerprint of climate change: Heat, drought and wildfires

Updated 12:41 PM ET, Tue August 7, 2018

A sunflower with dried leaves is seen near Perly-Certoux, Switzerland, on Monday, August 6.
Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

The weather in the month of July was further evidence that our climate is changing, experts say.

All-time record heat struck Japan and the Korean Peninsula, widespread drought and extreme heat raged across Europe, and very little of North America escaped oppressive above-average temperatures.

With prolonged drought and extreme temperatures, the only missing ingredient for wildfires is a spark and a little breeze. As the month drew to a close, we saw deadly fires rage in Greece and the western United States.

The heat and fires continue to blaze as we move into August. In places such as California, we are still two months away from the peak of wildfire season.

These images are likely to become more common if the globe continues to warm, climate experts say.

"The impacts of climate change are no longer subtle," said Michael Mann, a climate scientist and director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University.