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(CNN) —  

Alabama Democratic Sen. Doug Jones said Sunday that he could vote either way on President Donald Trump’s yet-to-be announced nominee to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

“I’m open to voting yes. I’m open to voting no. We don’t know who the nominee is going to be yet,” Jones told CNN’s Dana Bash on “State of the Union. “I don’t think my role is to rubber stamp for the President, but it’s also not an automatic knee-jerk no, either.”

The President said last week that of the winnowed group of four potential nominees he is now considering, “I have it down to three or two,” and he will announce his decision Monday evening.

Jones said that regardless of who the nominee is, “we’re going to give them a very, very good, hard and fair look to determine what I believe to be the best interest of my constituents, but also the country.”

As a Democrat in a red state, Jones faces more pressure to support the President than other Democrats in the Senate already opposing Trump’s potential nominee.

“I don’t think anyone should expect me to simply vote yes for this nominee, just simply because my state may be more conservative than others,” Jones said.