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US Attorney General Jeff Sessions looks on during a press conference regarding the arrest of bombing suspect Cesar Sayoc in Florida, at the Department of Justice in Washington, DC on October 26, 2018. - The suspect has been charged with five federal crimes in connection with more than a dozen suspicious packages sent in a US mail bombing spree, Sessions said. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images
US Attorney General Jeff Sessions looks on during a press conference regarding the arrest of bombing suspect Cesar Sayoc in Florida, at the Department of Justice in Washington, DC on October 26, 2018. - The suspect has been charged with five federal crimes in connection with more than a dozen suspicious packages sent in a US mail bombing spree, Sessions said. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
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US Attorney General Jeff Sessions (R) delivers remarks during the daily White House press briefing March 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. Sessions announced new actions against sanctuary cities that seek Justice Department grants during his surprise appearance. Also pictured is White House press secretary Sean Spicer
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US President Donald Trump applauds after addressing supporters at a Faith and Freedom Coalition event in Washington DC on June 08, 2017. President Donald Trump avoided directly responding to explosive accusations made by his ex-FBI director Thursday, but sought to rally supporters behind a message of defiance. "We are going to fight and win" Trump said, addressing supporters at a Faith and Freedom Coalition event in the capital. US Attorney General Jeff Sessions (R) delivers remarks during the daily White House press briefing March 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. Sessions announced new actions against sanctuary cities that seek Justice Department grants during his surprise appearance. Also pictured is White House press secretary Sean Spicer
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WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Jeff Sessions will travel to Boston, Massachusetts, on Monday, October 29, 2018 to give remarks to the Boston Lawyers Chapter of the Federalist Society on the Future of Religious Liberty.
CNN
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US President Donald Trump sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions on December 15, 2017 in Quantico, Virginia, before participating in the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony.
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President Donald Trump stands with Attorney General Jeff Sessions on December 15, 2017 in Quantico, Virginia, before participating in the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony.
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 US President Donald Trump applauds after addressing supporters at a Faith and Freedom Coalition event in Washington DC on June 08, 2017.
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US Attorney General Jeff Sessions (R) delivers remarks during the daily White House press briefing March 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. Sessions announced new actions against sanctuary cities that seek Justice Department grants during his surprise appearance. Also pictured is White House press secretary Sean Spicer
Getty Images
US President Donald Trump applauds after addressing supporters at a Faith and Freedom Coalition event in Washington DC on June 08, 2017. President Donald Trump avoided directly responding to explosive accusations made by his ex-FBI director Thursday, but sought to rally supporters behind a message of defiance. "We are going to fight and win" Trump said, addressing supporters at a Faith and Freedom Coalition event in the capital. US Attorney General Jeff Sessions (R) delivers remarks during the daily White House press briefing March 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. Sessions announced new actions against sanctuary cities that seek Justice Department grants during his surprise appearance. Also pictured is White House press secretary Sean Spicer
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US President Donald Trump departs the White House July 31, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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AG Sessions - Turning Point USA HS Leadership Summit Remarks  Attorney General Jeff Sessions will deliver remarks at Turning Point USA's High School Leadership Summit  OPEN PRESS (Camera Preset for K9 security sweep: 7:30 a.m. EDT // Final access time for print media without gear: 8:45 a.m. EDT)   NOTE:  All media must RSVP and present government-issued photo I.D. (such as a driver's license) as well as valid media credentials. (CNN has RSVP'd)
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AG Sessions - Turning Point USA HS Leadership Summit Remarks Attorney General Jeff Sessions will deliver remarks at Turning Point USA's High School Leadership Summit OPEN PRESS (Camera Preset for K9 security sweep: 7:30 a.m. EDT // Final access time for print media without gear: 8:45 a.m. EDT) NOTE: All media must RSVP and present government-issued photo I.D. (such as a driver's license) as well as valid media credentials. (CNN has RSVP'd)
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(CNN) —  

Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Tuesday withdrew a number of policy “guidance documents” from past administrations related to immigration that he found “unnecessary, outdated, inconsistent with existing law, or otherwise improper.”

The move comes in addition to his rescinding Obama-era policies on using race in higher education admissions Tuesday.

The rescinded documents did not confer legal rights but rather functioned as easy-to-use resources created to explain the parameters of complicated areas of the law, such as the Immigration and Nationality Act, or simply to assist non-English speakers.

One guide titled “Look at the Facts, Not at the Faces: Your Guide to Fair Employment” offers guidance on how to avoid immigration-related employment discrimination. A one-page handout titled “Refugees and Asylees Have the Right to Work” appears to function as a practical resource for employers.

In a statement Tuesday, Sessions said these documents were wrongheaded because “agencies often tried to impose new rules on the American people without any public notice or comment period.”

But some Justice Department alumni found the move misguided.

“For example, when in the DOJ Criminal Division I worked on the DOJ Language Access Plan which was about making sure witnesses and victims of crimes (not criminals) had the ability to understand processes & what their rights were in a language other than English,” tweeted Julie Zebrak, who spent 18 years at the Justice Department and emphasized that the guidance served a practical purpose.

“How can you usefully help serve as a witness when you can’t read what the paperwork, emails, & website say about what you need to do, where you need to be, what forms you need to complete, etc.?” she wrote in additional Twitter posts.

Aside from rolling back Obama-era guidance, Sessions is taking more concrete steps on immigration.

CNN reported Friday that the Justice Department is considering a draft regulation that would prevent people from claiming asylum if they’re convicted of illegally entering the United States. Sessions has frequently said those seeking asylum should go to valid ports of entry when coming into the country.