FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. The Supreme Court is ordering Washington courts to take a new look at the case of a florist who refused to provide services for the wedding of two men because of her religious objection to same-sex marriage.  The justices' order Monday means the court is passing for now on the chance to decide whether business owners can refuse on religious grounds to comply with anti-discrimination laws that protect LGBT people.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
PHOTO: J. Scott Applewhite/AP
FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. The Supreme Court is ordering Washington courts to take a new look at the case of a florist who refused to provide services for the wedding of two men because of her religious objection to same-sex marriage. The justices' order Monday means the court is passing for now on the chance to decide whether business owners can refuse on religious grounds to comply with anti-discrimination laws that protect LGBT people.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Now playing
01:52
SCOTUS sides with faith-based pregnancy centers
 Front row from left, U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, and Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, back row from left, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr., Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch pose for a group portrait in the East Conference Room of the Supreme Court June 1, 2017 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Alex Wong/Getty Images
Front row from left, U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, and Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, back row from left, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr., Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch pose for a group portrait in the East Conference Room of the Supreme Court June 1, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:45
Just how old are the Supreme Court justices?
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:44
LGBT advocate: Devastated not strong enough word
People gather outside the Supreme Court during oral arguments in the U.S. v. Micosoft case February 27, 2018 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
People gather outside the Supreme Court during oral arguments in the U.S. v. Micosoft case February 27, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:53
Supreme Court deals blow to organized labor
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23: People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court, on April 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. Today the high court is hearing arguments in Chavez-Mesa v. US, which concerns a technical matter regarding sentencing guidelines. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will be representing the government. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23: People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court, on April 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. Today the high court is hearing arguments in Chavez-Mesa v. US, which concerns a technical matter regarding sentencing guidelines. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will be representing the government. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:48
Supreme Court upholds Trump's travel ban
Justices of the US Supreme Court sit for their official group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on June 1, 2017. 
Seated (L-R): Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Anthony M. Kennedy, Chief Justice of the US John G. Roberts, Associate Justices Clarence Thomas and Stephen Breyer. Standing (L-R): Associate Justices Elena Kagan, Samuel Alito Jr., Sonia Sotomayor and Neil Gorsuch. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Justices of the US Supreme Court sit for their official group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on June 1, 2017. Seated (L-R): Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Anthony M. Kennedy, Chief Justice of the US John G. Roberts, Associate Justices Clarence Thomas and Stephen Breyer. Standing (L-R): Associate Justices Elena Kagan, Samuel Alito Jr., Sonia Sotomayor and Neil Gorsuch. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:16
How are Supreme Court justices chosen?
WASHINGTON - MARCH 08:  U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy testifies before the House Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee on Capitol Hill March 8, 2007 in Washington, DC. Thomas and fellow Justice Clarence Thomas spoke about concerns with the ongoing remodeling of the court building, the reduction of paperwork due to electronic media and the disparity of pay between federal judges and lawyers working in the private sector.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON - MARCH 08: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy testifies before the House Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee on Capitol Hill March 8, 2007 in Washington, DC. Thomas and fellow Justice Clarence Thomas spoke about concerns with the ongoing remodeling of the court building, the reduction of paperwork due to electronic media and the disparity of pay between federal judges and lawyers working in the private sector. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:58
Justice Kennedy harshly critiques Trump
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 12: Members of the Supreme Court, (L-R) Chief Justice John Roberts and associate justices Anthony Kennendy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, John Paul Stevens, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, applaud as U.S. President Barack Obama arrives to deliver his State of the Union speech before a joint session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol February 12, 2013 in Washington, DC. Facing a divided Congress, Obama focused his speech on new initiatives designed to stimulate the U.S. economy and said, 'It?s not a bigger government we need, but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad-based growth'. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 12: Members of the Supreme Court, (L-R) Chief Justice John Roberts and associate justices Anthony Kennendy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, John Paul Stevens, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, applaud as U.S. President Barack Obama arrives to deliver his State of the Union speech before a joint session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol February 12, 2013 in Washington, DC. Facing a divided Congress, Obama focused his speech on new initiatives designed to stimulate the U.S. economy and said, 'It?s not a bigger government we need, but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad-based growth'. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:21
A look at the current Supreme Court
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy testifies before the House Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee on Capitol Hill March 8, 2007 in Washington, DC. Kennedy and Justice Clarence Thomas spoke about concerns with the ongoing remodeling of the court building, the reduction of paperwork due to electronic media and the disparity of pay between federal judges and lawyers working in the private sector.
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy testifies before the House Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee on Capitol Hill March 8, 2007 in Washington, DC. Kennedy and Justice Clarence Thomas spoke about concerns with the ongoing remodeling of the court building, the reduction of paperwork due to electronic media and the disparity of pay between federal judges and lawyers working in the private sector.
Now playing
01:17
Anthony Kennedy: The swing vote
WASHINGTON - JUNE 25: The exterior view of the U.S. Supreme Court is seen June 25, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court has ruled to give more freedom for interest groups and unions to run TV ads before elections, and also ruled to limit taxpayers' rights to challenge government initiatives as unconstitutionally promoting religion. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
PHOTO: File/Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON - JUNE 25: The exterior view of the U.S. Supreme Court is seen June 25, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court has ruled to give more freedom for interest groups and unions to run TV ads before elections, and also ruled to limit taxpayers' rights to challenge government initiatives as unconstitutionally promoting religion. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:20
Contentious past SCOTUS confirmation hearings
Now playing
04:04
Listen as lawyers argue travel ban case
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, celebrating her 20th anniversary on the bench, is photographed in the West conference room at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Friday, August 30, 2013. (Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHOTO: The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, celebrating her 20th anniversary on the bench, is photographed in the West conference room at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Friday, August 30, 2013. (Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:23
R.B.G. loved being 'notorious'
PHOTO: Will Mullery/CNN
Now playing
02:39
Listen to SCOTUS take up gerrymandering
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg participates in an annual Women's History Month reception hosted by Pelosi in the U.S. capitol building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.  This year's event honored the women Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court: Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan.
PHOTO: Allison Shelley/Getty Images
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg participates in an annual Women's History Month reception hosted by Pelosi in the U.S. capitol building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. This year's event honored the women Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court: Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan.
Now playing
00:42
Ginsburg: For so long, women were silent
Now playing
03:11
Hear Supreme Court arguments about cakeshop
(CNN) —  

Registered voters are more likely to say they will vote for a candidate who supports access to abortion services, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll, released Friday.

While more voters said they would support a candidates in favor of abortion rights, at 42%, it was not a clear majority. Almost three-in-10 people polled said they will vote for a candidate who wants to restrict access to abortion service, and a quarter said it doesn’t make a difference.

The issue of abortion will be newly important in 2018 after Justice Anthony Kennedy, the key swing vote on abortion cases in recent years, announced Wednesday he would retire from the Supreme Court. The Kaiser poll was conducted before Kennedy’s announcement. President Trump has expressed a preference for proven conservatives and he will now nominate a successor to Kennedy, who voted to preserve Roe v. Wade on multiple occasions.

“In light of Justice Kennedy’s retirement, voters’ views on abortion are back in the spotlight, but we found there are many other issues affecting women that voters say may influence how they vote, including paid family leave, workplace protections against sexual harassment, and even the #MeToo movement,” said Molly Brodie, senior vice president for executive operations at Kaiser Family Foundation said in an email. “Particularly for women and Democratic voters, these issues are one factor in how they’re evaluating candidates.”

Democrats were much more likely to say they’ll vote for a candidate who supports access to abortion services, at 72% with only 14% of Republicans agreeing. Almost half of women agreed that would make them more likely to vote for a candidate, compared to 37% of men. Women ages 18 to 44 were even more likely, at 57% support, a quarter wanting to restrict.

Activists on both sides of the issue are gearing up for a fight and those who oppose abortion rights see an opening.

CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin tweeted after the retirement announcement: “Anthony Kennedy is retiring. Abortion will be illegal in twenty states in 18 months. #SCOTUS”

While a new conservative justice could put the Roe precedent in jeopardy, it’s clear that most Americans wouldn’t agree with a decision to repeal the ruling on abortion in the court.

In December 2016, Pew Research asked respondents if they would like to see the Supreme Court overturn the Roe v. Wade decision – a ruling that established a woman’s constitutional right to an abortion in the first three months of pregnancy. The highest number of Americans (69%) said “no, don’t overturn” since Pew started asking the question in 2003. Only 28% want it to be overturned. The Kaiser release had only 29% saying that it should be overturned, with 16% of Democrats and 53% of Republicans. There was no substantial difference between men and women – both supporting Roe v. Wade at 65 to 68%.

Legal abortion has been favorable among the majority of Americans for a very long time, with around 80% saying it should be legal under all or certain circumstances since Gallup began polling on the issue in 1975. It hit its most recent high in September 1995, when 85% of voters said that some or all abortions should be legal.

Fewer people consider themselves “pro-choice,” a politically loaded term, than say abortion should be legal in all or some circumstances. Gallup’s May 2018 polling showing a split between those who say they are pro-choice (48%) and pro-life (48%). But in that poll 50% supported legal abortion in certain circumstances, 29% supported legal abortion in all circumstances and 18% wanted it to be illegal in all circumstances.