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(CNN) —  

The Supreme Court just handed a huge victory to the Trump administration by upholding its controversial travel ban – which restricts nationals from seven countries from entering the US.

But there have been several versions of the travel ban, along with plenty of confusion. Here’s what the latest travel ban means to citizens of those countries – and some American citizens, too.

The countries in the ban

This is the third version of the travel ban, issued in September after previous bans bounced around through the courts. The Trump administration says this latest version restricts entry from the following seven countries to varying degrees:

  • Iran
  • North Korea
  • Syria
  • Libya
  • Yemen
  • Somalia
  • Venezuela.

(Chad was originally on the list, but it was recently removed after meeting security requirements.)

Candidate Trump: Ban all Muslim travel to the US

Who is suspended and why

The rules vary by country. Here’s what the White House said when it unveiled the latest version of the travel ban last September:

Iran

Why it’s suspended: Iran “regularly fails to cooperate” with the US in identifying security risks and is the source of significant terrorist threats, the White House said. And the State Department calls Iran a state sponsor of terrorism.

Which Iranians can’t come: Entry is suspended for immigrants and nonimmigrants (those on a temporary visa who aren’t trying to become permanent residents). But there are some exceptions. Those with valid student (F and M) and exchange visitor (J) visas are not suspended, but will have to face enhanced screening.

Libya

Why it’s suspended: While Libya is an “important and valuable counterterrorism partner” of the US, it still has difficulty sharing terror-related information. And the “substantial terrorist presence” in Libya “amplifies the risks posed by the entry into the United States of its nationals,” the White House said.

Which Libyans can’t come: Entry is suspended for immigrants and nonimmigrants who are on business (B-1) visas, tourist (B-2) visas, and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.

North Korea

Why it’s suspended: North Korea doesn’t cooperate with the US government in any way and doesn’t share important information, the White House said.

Which North Koreans can’t come: Neither immigrants nor nonimmigrants from North Korea can come to the US.

Somalia

Why it’s suspended: Somalia is grappling with “a persistent terrorist threat,” and the US government calls Somalia “a terrorist safe haven,” the White House said.

Which Somalis can’t come: Somalis seeking immigration to the US are suspended.

Syria

Why it’s suspended: Syria regularly fails to cooperate with the US on identifying security risks, the White House said. The State Department calls the Syrian regime a state sponsor of terrorism.

Which Syrians can’t come: Neither immigrants nor nonimmigrants can come – not even Syrian refugees trying to escape the gruesome civil war.

Venezuela

Why it’s suspended: The Venezuelan government fails to adequately share public-safety and terrorism-related information, the Trump administration said.

Which Venezuelans can’t come: The suspension doesn’t affect most Venezuelans – mainly just government officials responsible for those inadequacies, the White House said.

Yemen

Why it’s suspended: While the Yemeni government is “an important and valuable counterterrorism partner,” it still faces management challenges and a significant terrorist presence, the White House said.

Which Yemenis can’t come: Immigrants are suspended, as well as nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.

Which relatives can still come

If you’re a legal US resident or American citizen and have family from one of the affected countries, close relatives might still be able to come to the US.

Parents, spouses or children could still be admitted into the country, the White House said. But families won’t get categorical waivers; instead, waivers would be granted on a case-by-case basis.

CNN’s Catherine E. Shoichet and Ariane de Vogue contributed to this report.