New National Security Adviser John Bolton(R) listens to US President Donald Trump speak during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington, DC, on April 9, 2018.
President Donald Trump said Monday that "major decisions" would be made on a Syria response in the next day or two, after warning that Damascus would have a "big price to pay" over an alleged chemical attack on a rebel-held town.Trump condemned what he called a "heinous attack on innocent" Syrians in Douma, as he opened a cabinet meeting at the White House. 
 / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
New National Security Adviser John Bolton(R) listens to US President Donald Trump speak during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington, DC, on April 9, 2018. President Donald Trump said Monday that "major decisions" would be made on a Syria response in the next day or two, after warning that Damascus would have a "big price to pay" over an alleged chemical attack on a rebel-held town.Trump condemned what he called a "heinous attack on innocent" Syrians in Douma, as he opened a cabinet meeting at the White House. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:05
Bolton: US will impose all pre-deal Iran sanctions
Iranian women chant slogans during an anti-US demonstration outside the former US embassy headquarters in the capital Tehran on May 9, 2018. - Iranians reacted with a mix of sadness, resignation and defiance on May 9 to US President Donald Trump's withdrawal from the nuclear deal, with sharp divisions among officials on how best to respond.
For many, Trump's decision on Tuesday to pull out of the landmark nuclear deal marked the final death knell for the hope created when it was signed in 2015 that Iran might finally escape decades of isolation and US hostility. (Photo by ATTA KENARE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
ATTA KENARE/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Iranian women chant slogans during an anti-US demonstration outside the former US embassy headquarters in the capital Tehran on May 9, 2018. - Iranians reacted with a mix of sadness, resignation and defiance on May 9 to US President Donald Trump's withdrawal from the nuclear deal, with sharp divisions among officials on how best to respond. For many, Trump's decision on Tuesday to pull out of the landmark nuclear deal marked the final death knell for the hope created when it was signed in 2015 that Iran might finally escape decades of isolation and US hostility. (Photo by ATTA KENARE / AFP) (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:39
How will US pulling out of deal impact Iranians?
CNN
Now playing
01:07
Trump announces withdrawal from Iran deal
Photo Illustration: Getty/Shutterstock/CNNMoney
Now playing
01:55
Breaking down Trump's decision to leave the Iran deal
Iranian lawmakers burn two pieces of papers representing the U.S. flag and the nuclear deal as they chant slogans against the U.S. at the parliament in Tehran, Iran, Wednesday, May 9, 2018. Iranian lawmakers have set a paper U.S. flag ablaze at parliament after President Donald Trump's nuclear deal pullout, shouting, "Death to America!". President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the deal on Tuesday and restored harsh sanctions against Iran. (AP Photo)
AP
Iranian lawmakers burn two pieces of papers representing the U.S. flag and the nuclear deal as they chant slogans against the U.S. at the parliament in Tehran, Iran, Wednesday, May 9, 2018. Iranian lawmakers have set a paper U.S. flag ablaze at parliament after President Donald Trump's nuclear deal pullout, shouting, "Death to America!". President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the deal on Tuesday and restored harsh sanctions against Iran. (AP Photo)
Now playing
00:38
Watch: US flag set alight in Iran's parliament
France Nuclear Fallout_00005926.jpg
France Nuclear Fallout_00005926.jpg
Now playing
02:59
Renewed Iran sanctions may hurt France as well
U.S. President Donald Trump answers questions from the press during a meeting with former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in the Oval Office October 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump answered a range of questions during the portion of the meeting that was open to the press, including queries on Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
Win McNamee/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump answers questions from the press during a meeting with former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in the Oval Office October 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump answered a range of questions during the portion of the meeting that was open to the press, including queries on Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
Now playing
02:04
Years of Trump panning the Iran deal
ISFAHAN, IRAN - MARCH 30:  A worker walks inside of an uranium conversion facility March 30, 2005 just outside the city of Isfahan, about 254 miles (410 kilometers), south of capital Tehran, Iran. The cities of Isfahan and Natanz in central Iran are home to the heart of Iran's nuclear program. The facility in Isfahan makes hexaflouride gas, which is then enriched by feeding it into centrifuges at a facility in Natanz, Iran. Iran's President Mohammad Khatami and the head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation Gholamreza Aghazadeh is scheduled to visit the facilities. (Photo by Getty Images)
Getty Images/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
ISFAHAN, IRAN - MARCH 30: A worker walks inside of an uranium conversion facility March 30, 2005 just outside the city of Isfahan, about 254 miles (410 kilometers), south of capital Tehran, Iran. The cities of Isfahan and Natanz in central Iran are home to the heart of Iran's nuclear program. The facility in Isfahan makes hexaflouride gas, which is then enriched by feeding it into centrifuges at a facility in Natanz, Iran. Iran's President Mohammad Khatami and the head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation Gholamreza Aghazadeh is scheduled to visit the facilities. (Photo by Getty Images)
Now playing
01:20
Explaining the Iran nuclear deal
CNN
Now playing
00:47
John Kerry wants Trump to stay in Iran deal
Now playing
01:47
Rouhani: Pity if rogue newcomers end the deal
President Donald Trump delivers a statement on the Iran nuclear deal from the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 8, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Evan Vucci/AP
President Donald Trump delivers a statement on the Iran nuclear deal from the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 8, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Now playing
02:42
Trump: US withdrawing from Iran deal
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 04:  Former CIA Director Gen. Michael Hayden (Ret.) testifies during a hearing before Senate Armed Services Committee August 4, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The committee held a hearing on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and the military balance in the Middle East.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 04: Former CIA Director Gen. Michael Hayden (Ret.) testifies during a hearing before Senate Armed Services Committee August 4, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The committee held a hearing on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and the military balance in the Middle East. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:12
Ex-CIA chief: Netanyahu's findings are old news
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu presents material on Iranian nuclear weapons development during a press conference in Tel Aviv, Monday, April 30 2018. Netanyahu says his government has obtained "half a ton" of secret Iranian documents proving the Tehran government once had a nuclear weapons program. Calling it a "great intelligence achievement," Netanyahu said Monday that the documents show that Iran lied about its nuclear ambitions before signing a 2015 deal with world powers. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
Sebastian Scheiner/AP
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu presents material on Iranian nuclear weapons development during a press conference in Tel Aviv, Monday, April 30 2018. Netanyahu says his government has obtained "half a ton" of secret Iranian documents proving the Tehran government once had a nuclear weapons program. Calling it a "great intelligence achievement," Netanyahu said Monday that the documents show that Iran lied about its nuclear ambitions before signing a 2015 deal with world powers. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
Now playing
02:15
Responses in wake of Netanyahu's Iran speech
Josh Rogin 01
CNN
Josh Rogin 01
Now playing
01:44
Takeaways from Netanyahu's Iran remarks
pool
Now playing
01:31
Trump: Iran under control of fanatical regime
nikki haley us evidence against iran weapons sot _00013621.jpg
nikki haley us evidence against iran weapons sot _00013621.jpg
Now playing
02:00
Haley: This is concrete evidence against Iran
(CNN) —  

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif touched down in Moscow on Monday morning as part of a series of international diplomatic meetings aimed at saving the Iran nuclear deal following the United States’ withdrawal.

Zarif will be discussing the agreement with his Russian counterpart, Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, state-run Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) reported on Monday.

It follows a visit by the Iranian diplomat to Beijing on Sunday where he stressed the importance of keeping the accords, which were signed in 2015 with the aim of both halting Tehran’s nuclear ambitions and stimulating the country’s economy.

Lavrov and Zarif will discuss the “possibility of preserving the Iran nuclear deal,” according to Russian state media agency TASS. Moscow has previously stated its strong support for the agreement.

US President Donald Trump announced on May 8 the US would be withdrawing from the deal, which was signed under former President Barack Obama, saying it was “defective at its core.”

Trump also said he planned to reintroduce the highest level of economic sanctions on Iran.

But other countries around the world, including Germany, France and the United Kingdom, have said they would like to keep the original deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA), in place.

In Beijing, Zarif met with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi who reiterated Beijing’s support for the deal, according to state media Xinhua.

“China will take an objective, fair and responsible attitude, keep communication and cooperation with all parties concerned, and continue to work to maintain the deal,” Wang said, adding the agreement was “hard-earned.”

Chinese State Councillor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi (R) meets Iran's Javad Zarif at the Diaoyutai state guesthouse in Beijing on May 13.
THOMAS PETER/AFP/Getty Images
Chinese State Councillor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi (R) meets Iran's Javad Zarif at the Diaoyutai state guesthouse in Beijing on May 13.

Under the 2015 deal, Iran would reduce its ability to enrich uranium and allow inspections by an independent agency in return for the lifting of strict sanctions which were choking the country’s stagnating economy.

Iran: 60 days to save the deal

Iran’s Deputy Foreign Minister for Political Affairs Abbas Araqchi said Germany, France and the United Kingdom had 60 days to provide Iran *with enough guarantees to ensure it could* stay in the deal, according to IRNA.

Zarif will meet with the foreign ministers of the three European countries in Brussels on Tuesday, May 15 to discuss the future of the deal.

A number of top Iranian officials and politicians have threatened in the past week to restart the country’s nuclear program following Trump’s decision to leave the deal.

“The President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran has been tasked with taking all necessary steps in preparation for Iran to pursue industrial-scale enrichment without any restrictions,” Zarif said on Friday.

But European leaders have been working hard to mollify Tehran – UK Prime Minister Theresa May spoke to Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Sunday to assure him of her support for the deal.

“She said it is in both the UK and Iran’s national security interests to maintain the deal and welcomed President Rouhani’s public commitment to abide by its terms, adding that it is essential that Iran continues to meet its obligations,” a UK government spokesperson said in a statement.

During the call, Rouhani said the US decision to withdraw from the deal was “unlawful” and “irresponsible.”