TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump waits to speak during a memorial service at the Pentagon for the 9/11 terrorist attacks  September 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski        (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump waits to speak during a memorial service at the Pentagon for the 9/11 terrorist attacks September 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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title: Chairman Orrin Hatch: Assessing the impact of tax reform | LIVE STREAM  duration: 01:25:52  sub-clip duration: 4:00  site: Youtube  author: null  published: Thu Mar 01 2018 10:30:11 GMT-0500 (Eastern Standard Time)  intervention: yes  description: In December, Congress passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the most sweeping overhaul of America's tax code in more than 30 years. How will the reduction in the corporate income tax rate and other features of the new tax law affect the US economy?    Please join AEI for remarks by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT) on the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. After Chairman Hatch's remarks, an expert panel will discuss the legislation further.Watch other videos about "Topic"    Subscribe
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title: Chairman Orrin Hatch: Assessing the impact of tax reform | LIVE STREAM duration: 01:25:52 sub-clip duration: 4:00 site: Youtube author: null published: Thu Mar 01 2018 10:30:11 GMT-0500 (Eastern Standard Time) intervention: yes description: In December, Congress passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the most sweeping overhaul of America's tax code in more than 30 years. How will the reduction in the corporate income tax rate and other features of the new tax law affect the US economy? Please join AEI for remarks by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT) on the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. After Chairman Hatch's remarks, an expert panel will discuss the legislation further.Watch other videos about "Topic" Subscribe
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9/25/17, CNN, Washington, D.C. 

Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) speak at a CNN townhall debate on healthcare at the CNN headquarters in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 25, 2017. 

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9/25/17, CNN, Washington, D.C. Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) speak at a CNN townhall debate on healthcare at the CNN headquarters in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 25, 2017. Gabriella Demczuk / CNN
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(CNN) —  

The White House is seeking to cut funding from the Children’s Health Insurance Program, known as CHIP, as part of its larger request for cuts to the federal budget in a rescissions package sent to Congress this week.

The request from President Donald Trump includes a $7 billion cut to the popular program, part of $15 billion in overall cuts. Some $2 billion would come from a contingency fund that was created to prevent states from running out of money, with the rest coming from funding that Congress has authorized for the program but states haven’t spent.

The administration defended the cuts, telling reporters Monday the money would come from untapped leftover funds and wouldn’t affect operations at CHIP or in other health care areas.

“This is money that was never going to be spent,” said one official.

The request is part of the administration’s efforts to “rein in out-of-control federal spending,” per a White House statement, something Trump railed against on the campaign trail as he promised to “drain the swamp.” His rival, Hillary Clinton, campaigned in 2016 on her advocacy for the bill while first lady.

While it’s unlikely that the package will pass Congress in the midterm election year, Trump’s move opens some painful wounds for Congress. Lawmakers recently struggled for months to fund the program that is highly valued by parents and by officials on both sides of the political aisle.

CHIP covers about 9 million children whose parents usually earn too much to qualify for Medicaid, but not enough to afford private health coverage – typically no more than $62,000 for a family of four. The 20-year-old program is paid for almost entirely by the federal government.

But CHIP got caught up in the battle to fund the federal government last fall. Congress failed to reauthorize a long-term appropriation for it for months after its funding ended on September 30. Lawmakers were at odds over how to pay for it.

States began warning that children would lose their coverage if lawmakers didn’t act fast. Parents pleaded with Congress to keep their children insured. And even Jimmy Kimmel urged Americans to tell their representatives to fund the program.

Congress finally passed a six-year extension of CHIP funding on January 22 and then added another four years in a February budget deal.

A Congressional Budget Office analysis earlier this year showed that funding CHIP for 10 years would save the federal government $6 billion over 10 years.

CNN’s Kevin Liptak contributed to this report.