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Editor’s Note: This story was first published in 2013.

CNN —  

It’s been more than half a century since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas on November 22, 1963. Whether you were alive at the time or not, you probably know that Lee Harvey Oswald killed the President, only to be fatally gunned down by Jack Ruby two days later.

You probably also know there are hundreds of conspiracy theories about who was behind the assassination, and whether Oswald was the lone gunman or if there was another shooter on the infamous grassy knoll.

Here are five things you may not know about the assassination of the 35th president of the United States:

1. Oswald wasn’t arrested for JFK killing

In front of reporters, Jack Ruby killed Kennedy's alleged assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald.
Robert H. Jackson/Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images
In front of reporters, Jack Ruby killed Kennedy's alleged assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald.

Lee Harvey Oswald was actually arrested for fatally shooting a police officer, Dallas patrolman J.D. Tippitt, 45 minutes after killing Kennedy.

He denied killing either one and, as he was being transferred to county jail two days later, he was shot and killed by Dallas nightclub operator Jack Ruby.

2. Assassinating the president wasn’t a federal crime in 1963

Kennedy, moments before he was assassinated.
Historical/Corbis Historical/Corbis via Getty Images
Kennedy, moments before he was assassinated.

Despite the assassinations of three U.S. presidents – Abraham Lincoln, James Garfield and William McKinley – killing or attempting to harm a president wasn’t a federal offense until 1965, two years after Kennedy’s death.

3. TV networks suspended shows for four days

The NBC News Bureau covers the assassination President of John F. Kennedy.
NBC NewsWire via Getty Images
The NBC News Bureau covers the assassination President of John F. Kennedy.

On November 22, 1963, at 12:40 p.m. CST – just 10 minutes after President Kennedy was shot – CBS broadcast the first nationwide TV news bulletin on the shooting.

After that, all three television networks – CBS, NBC, and ABC – interrupted their regular programming to cover the assassination for four straight days. The JFK assassination was the longest uninterrupted news event on television until the coverage of the September 11 attacks in 2001.

4. It led to the first and only time a woman swore in a US president

Judge Sarah Hughes swears in Lyndon Baines Johnson as president.
Universal Images Group/Getty Images
Judge Sarah Hughes swears in Lyndon Baines Johnson as president.

Hours after the assassination, Vice President Lyndon Johnson was sworn in as president aboard Air Force One, with Jacqueline Kennedy at his side, an event captured in an in an iconic photograph. Federal Judge Sarah Hughes administered the oath, the only woman ever to do so.

5. Oswald had tried to assassinate Kennedy foe

Then-retired Maj. Gen. Edwin Walker organized protests against the racial integration of University of Mississippi in September 1962.
Paris Match via Getty Images
Then-retired Maj. Gen. Edwin Walker organized protests against the racial integration of University of Mississippi in September 1962.

Eight months before Oswald assassinated JFK, he tried to kill an outspoken anti-communist, former U.S. Army Gen. Edwin Walker.

After his resignation from the US Army in 1961, Walker became an outspoken critic of the Kennedy administration and actively opposed the move to racially integrate schools in the South. The Warren Commission, charged with investigating Kennedy’s 1963 assassination, found that Oswald had tried to shoot and kill Walker while the retired general was inside his home. Walker suffered minor injuries from bullet fragments.