What happens when a patient says, 'Doc, help me die'

Updated 7:49 AM ET, Tue March 20, 2018

This piece is the third part of a CNN Opinion series, "What it's like to be me," which explores the personal struggles Americans face at a time of profound social change. E. Wesley Ely is a physician and the Grant. W. Liddle Professor of Medicine and Critical Care at Vanderbilt University, Tennessee Valley VA GRECC, and the founder of the Vanderbilt ICU Delirium and Cognitive Impairment Study Group. The views expressed here are solely his.

(CNN)"But can't you help me die, Doc?"

My 54-year-old patient was alone in the intensive care unit, with no family or friends in his life. He slumped in his bed, gasping, staring up at me. Admitted with lung fibrosis and pneumonia, he had scars and infection aggressively replacing his airways, despite our best treatments.
E. Wes Ely
As a newly minted doctor years ago, my mind was usually occupied with beeps and buzzers providing me technical information to help calculate choices about patients' care. Having developed gray hair over many years at the bedside, my first priority is now more straightforward: to hear the voices of the vulnerable people looking up at me from their bed. That is what I try to do as a physician, including, of course, what they tell me in the silences.
I pulled a chair next to his bed so we could talk at eye level. His face was blank. "I want euthanasia. I'm going to die soon, so what's the point of living longer? I'm just wasted space."
I felt nauseated. The illegality of euthanasia was not what ran through my mind. Instead I thought about how Paul had