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(CNN) —  

Rabbits are multiplying in the childrens’ book section.

Comedian John Oliver is provoking Mike Pence with a parody book about the vice president’s pet bunny to coincide with the Pence family’s release of a new children’s book.

“Marlon Bundo’s A Day in the Life of the Vice President” was written by the vice president’s daughter, Charlotte Pence, and illustrated by second lady Karen Pence, a watercolor artist. The book, which is out Monday, “gives young readers a bunny’s-eye view of the special duties of the vice president,” per its publisher.

Not to be out-bunned, HBO’s “Last Week Tonight” released its own version, “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents a Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo.”

The late-night comedy news program’s book “tells the story of Vice President Mike Pence’s famed pet rabbit’s same-sex wedding,” per its publisher.

“I live with my Mom, Grandma, and Grampa in an old, stuffy house on the grounds of the U.S. Naval Observatory. That’s because my Grampa is the vice president. His name is Mike Pence. But this story isn’t going to be about him because he isn’t very fun. This story is about me, because I’m very, very fun,” an excerpt of the spoof Bundo book reads alongside a watercolor picture of the rabbit, clad in a multicolor bow tie, hula-hooping on the grounds of the vice president’s residence.

Pence was criticized during his time as Indiana governor for his positions on issues important to the LGBTQ community, including signing a religious freedom bill into law in 2015.

A spokesperson for Regnery Publishing, which issued the Pences’ book, called the parody “unfortunate.”

“It’s unfortunate that anyone would feel the need to ridicule an educational children’s book and turn it into something controversial and partisan. Our and Mrs. and Charlotte Pence’s goal is – and will continue to be – to educate young readers about the important role of the vice president, as well as to highlight the charities to which portions of the book proceeds will be donated,” the spokesperson said in a statement.

The proceeds of “A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo” will be donated to The Trevor Project and AIDS United, while the Pences will donate a portion their proceeds to A21, a nonprofit focused on combating human trafficking, and an art therapy program at Riley Hospital for Children.

The parody version of the book was the No.1 bestseller on Amazon.com Monday morning. The Pence version ranked 15th.