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(CNN) —  

On Tuesday morning, Donald Trump tried to change the narrative. As always, he did so with a tweet. This tweet:

“The new Fake News narrative is that there is CHAOS in the White House. Wrong! People will always come & go, and I want strong dialogue before making a final decision. I still have some people that I want to change (always seeking perfection). There is no Chaos, only great Energy!”

Hmmmm.

That assertion – No chaos, No chaos, You’re the chaos – directly contradicts what Trump himself said on Saturday night. “I like turnover,” he said in a speech to the Gridiron Club in Washington. “I like chaos. It really is good.”

It also directly contradicts a little thing I like to call the facts. Here’s a far-from-complete list of the events in and around the Trump White House over the past few weeks:

So, yeah.

In fact, Trump directly contradicted himself on the alleged lack of chaos in his administration in the very tweet in which he asserts everything is going totally according to plan.”I still have some people that I want to change (always seeking perfection),” he wrote.

What better way to quiet talk of chaos within your administration than to make clear you still have some people you want to get rid of? That should calm peoples’ nerves and keep the media from asking questions about who is going to resign next! It’s fool-proof!

Here’s the thing: Donald Trump loves chaos. He believes that in chaos or, more accurately, out of chaos comes progress and success. Throughout his life – including his time in the White House – Trump has pitted top advisers against one another, picked fights with his own advisers and, generally speaking, worked to stir things up whenever he got the chance.

This is who he is and what he does. Always has been. Always will be.

And, any even mildly-neutral examination of Trump’s White House over the past few weeks would conclude that it had descended into something approaching total chaos – sidetracked by departures and distractions.

That Trump is trying to dispute those facts isn’t surprising. But facts are pesky things. And you don’t change them with a tweet. Or even 100 tweets.