Battered Northeast preps for 2nd major storm this week

Updated 7:06 AM EST, Tue March 6, 2018
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(CNN) —  

New Englanders hit by the weekend’s nor’easter will barely have time to clean up before another storm could strike this week.

A Midwest storm is expected to combine with low pressure moving out of the Southeast to create a coastal low – and likely another nor’easter for Wednesday into Thursday. Winter storm watches already cover more than 33 million people, including New York City and Boston.

While the winds don’t look quite as strong as this most recent storm, this next one is forecast to be more of a classic nor’easter, with heavy snow possible for the major metropolitan areas.

The biggest impacts from the storm will likely be from Wednesday into Thursday morning.

Follow the storm here

In addition, while last weekend’s deadly nor’easter has moved offshore, high tides are expected early Monday on the New England coast.

The National Weather Service in Boston said in a tweet that winds are likely to remain an issue through Monday and that it’s monitoring for a potential nor’easter midweek.

Latest developments

• Deaths: At least seven people were killed by falling trees in recent days, including at least one child. Two people died in Virginia, one in Maryland, one in Massachusetts, one in New York, one in New Jersey and one in Rhode Island.

• Power outages: More than 215,000 customers from Virginia to Massachusetts were still without power as of Monday morning, including 74,280 in Massachusetts.

• Train services: Amtrak said all its services between Boston and Washington, D.C., will resume Monday after storm-related cancellations Friday. On Sunday, “nearly all” service had resumed, Amtrak said.

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Homes underwater

“The beach is all over the front yard – we have shingles from everyone else’s house but the house we are at actually withstood the storm pretty well,” Frank Wilkins of Marshfield, Massachusetts, told CNN affiliate WFXT.

In the aftermath of the storm, not every hazard is visible.

“Driving around, it’s dangerous. There’s a lot of trees laying against wires and intersections you can’t see,” said Butch Welch of Marshfield. “The lights are out at the intersections … it’s scary.”

The flooding is “the worst that we’ve seen in years,” said Capt. John Dougan of the Quincy, Massachusetts Police Department, which had carried out more than 250 rescues between 8 a.m. Friday and midmorning Saturday. “We’re seeing homes underwater, their basements were flooded out, the electricity was off.”

“We’re seeing homes underwater, their basements were flooded out, the electricity was off,” he said.

On Sunday, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker visited several cities including Quincy that had been pummeled by the storm. Baker had declared a state of emergency on Saturday.

The National Weather Service said “gusty winds and coastal flooding” would diminish as the storm pulled away from the Atlantic coast but emergency officials urged residents on higher ground to stay indoors, even after the storm pushed out.