A fruit plate is seen at the Buchinger-Wilhelmi Clinic in Ueberlingen, southern Germany, on March 24, 2014. High-end clinics specialising in deprivation rather than pampering are all the rage in Germany, one of the homes of the fasting movement, and in some cases it is even covered by health insurance plans. AFP PHOTO/CHRISTOF STACHE        (Photo credit should read CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
A fruit plate is seen at the Buchinger-Wilhelmi Clinic in Ueberlingen, southern Germany, on March 24, 2014. High-end clinics specialising in deprivation rather than pampering are all the rage in Germany, one of the homes of the fasting movement, and in some cases it is even covered by health insurance plans. AFP PHOTO/CHRISTOF STACHE (Photo credit should read CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:21
The best diets have this in common
THE BACHELORETTE - Fan favorite Becca Kufrin captured America's heart when she found herself at the center of one of the most gut-wrenching Bachelor breakups of all time. Now the Minnesota girl next door returns for a second shot at love and gets to hand out the roses, searching for her happily-ever-after in the 14th edition of ABC's hit series "The Bachelorette," premiering MONDAY, MAY 28 (8:00-10:01 p.m. EDT), on The ABC Television Network. (ABC/Craig Sjodin)
COLTON
Craig Sjodin/ABC
THE BACHELORETTE - Fan favorite Becca Kufrin captured America's heart when she found herself at the center of one of the most gut-wrenching Bachelor breakups of all time. Now the Minnesota girl next door returns for a second shot at love and gets to hand out the roses, searching for her happily-ever-after in the 14th edition of ABC's hit series "The Bachelorette," premiering MONDAY, MAY 28 (8:00-10:01 p.m. EDT), on The ABC Television Network. (ABC/Craig Sjodin) COLTON
Now playing
01:24
Former 'Bachelor' star says he is gay
USCG Southeast
Now playing
00:56
The Coast Guard is sending a warning with this video
Getty Images/FOX
Now playing
01:55
Hank Azaria feels need to apologize over 'Simpsons' Apu
Jeopardy Productions, Inc.
Now playing
01:02
Aaron Rodgers' Green Bay Packers question stumps 'Jeopardy!' contestants
Kalen Allen/ Food Network
Now playing
02:11
Popcorn salad recipe brings the internet to its knees
Tyfanee Fortuna
Now playing
02:22
Shelter places '13 lb rage machine' up for adoption
"Saturday Night Live" / NBC
Now playing
01:47
'SNL' sees Minnesota news anchors take on the Derek Chauvin trial
Shaquille O'Neal engagement ring mxp vpx _00000930.png
FAIR USE / Shaqfu_radio
Shaquille O'Neal engagement ring mxp vpx _00000930.png
Now playing
00:39
Shaq explains why he paid off customer's engagement ring
Getty Images
Now playing
02:18
This airplane-shaped bag is selling for more than some actual planes
Camerota Berman both
CNN
Camerota Berman both
Now playing
02:33
CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota gets surprise tribute from co-anchor
ABC/Jeopardy Productions. Inc.
Now playing
01:27
Aaron Rodgers laughs off hilarious answer on 'Jeopardy!'
Twitter/@slashkevin & ABC7
Now playing
01:17
Fans demand rule change for 'Wheel of Fortune'
Now playing
00:49
Deer crashes into a moving school bus and lands on a student
Now playing
01:04
Grandpa Monster is revealed on 'The Masked Singer'
ViralHog
Now playing
02:05
Mama bear's struggle with cubs looks hilariously familiar

Story highlights

For the eighth year in a row, the DASH diet comes in at No. 1

The Mediterranean diet was tied at No. 1 on the list

The worst-ranked overall diets were the popular keto and Dukan diets

(CNN) —  

If you’re a fan of the “fat-burning” keto diet, you’ll be fired up about its ranking in the 2018 list of best diets from US News and World Report: It’s tied for last, along with the relatively unknown Dukan diet.

Both stress eating a ton of protein or fat and minimal carbs, putting the dieter into “ketosis,” when the body breaks down both ingested and stored body fat into ketones, which it uses as energy. People on such diets often deal with fatigue and light-headedness as they adjust to a lack of carbohydrates.

Though the experts on the US News and World Report panel that created the list said eating that way isn’t harmful short-term, they ranked the diets poorly on long-term weight loss success, ease of use and overall impact on health.

For the relatively new keto diet, the experts were especially concerned about extremely high fat content – about 70% of daily calorie intake – as well as unusually low carbohydrate levels: only 15 to 20 net carbs a day. The 2015-20 dietary guidelines for Americans suggest that 45% to 65% of daily calories come from carbs but less than 10% from saturated fat.

“When you are on the keto diet, you drastically cut your carbs to only 20 per day. That’s less than one apple!” said nutritionist Lisa Drayer, a CNN contributor. “The keto diet is just not sustainable over the long term. It doesn’t teach you how to acquire healthy eating habits. It’s good for a quick fix, but most people I know can hardly give up pasta and bread, let alone beans and fruit.”

The expert panel was particularly concerned for people with liver or kidney conditions, “who should avoid it altogether,” the report said, adding that there was not enough evidence to know whether the diet would help those with heart issues or diabetes. Because of the recommended “cycling” nature of the diet, taking breaks and then starting it again, experts also warn that hormones could fluctuate.

Another popular low-carb diet, Whole30, was also at the bottom of the list, just before keto and Dukan. Whole30 is a 30-day diet designed to end “unhealthy cravings and habits, restore a healthy metabolism, heal your digestive tract and balance your immune system,” according to its website.

The panel slammed the diet as having “No independent research. Nonsensical claims. Extreme. Restrictive.” and tied it with the raw food diet as “the worst of the worst for healthy eating.”

First place is a tie

For the first time, the well-researched Mediterranean diet moved into first place, tied with the DASH diet. DASH, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, has held the top spot for eight consecutive years. Both diets also tied for healthiest in the rankings.

“What I love about both the DASH and Mediterranean diets is that they offer guiding principles for eating, like eating more fruits and vegetables, as well as whole grains, fish, legumes, nuts and low-fat dairy foods,” Drayer said. “I personally love the fact that a daily glass of red wine is encouraged as part of the Mediterranean diet.”

The DASH diet is often recommended to lower blood pressure. Its premise is simple: Eat more veggies, fruits and low-fat dairy foods while cutting way back on any food high in saturated fat and limit your intake of salt.

The meal plan includes three whole-grain products each day, four to six servings of vegetables, four to six servings of fruit, two to four servings of dairy products and several servings each of lean meats and nuts/seeds/legumes.

Studies have shown that following this diet can reduce blood pressure in a matter of weeks.

The Mediterranean diet also ranked first on the US News and World Report list for easiest diet to follow, best plant-based diet and best diet for diabetes. It came in second for best heart-healthy diet, just behind DASH.

Meals from the sunny Mediterranean have been linked to stronger bones, a healthier heart, a lower risk of dementia and breast cancer, and longer life, along with a