This product can be your trick to improving your posture at work  

Anna Hecht, CNN Underscored
Updated Thu June 14, 2018

Story highlights

  • Bad posture can be solved if you use a product, such as the Lumo Lift Posture Coach, as a reminder to sit up straight.

Slump, sit back, hunch forward and repeat. If this sounds like your daily posture rotation, you may want to consider investing in a tool to improve your posture when working a desk job.  

While many have tried bulky back braces or supportive cushions and chairs, these posture aids temporarily improve your posture rather than getting at the root of the problem.  

The Lumo Lift Posture Coach ($79.95; amazon.com) takes a different approach. This product acts as a tracker that syncs to your smartphone and alerts you when you've slumped too far from neutral spine, which is the natural position of the spine and the strongest position whenever sitting or standing.

How it works: The Lumo Lift is a small sensor that's magnetically connected to the neckline of your clothes near your collarbone. Once you've attached this device, you'll roll your shoulders into your most neutral sitting position and push the Lumo sensor to set your target posture and activate the monitor. Then, if you move too far from your target posture, the device has a built-in accelerometer that will alert you as a reminder to resume your most neutral position.  

It's not designed to be just a temporary fix for poor spine alignment. Instead, you're using your core muscles and heightening your awareness of what proper posture actually feels like. And this tiny monitor is more discreet than big back braces or supports or inserts for your desk chair.  

Still not convinced? Don't just take our word for it. More than 2,500 people have reviewed this product on Amazon, giving it a 3.7-star average rating. Now is the time to take charge of your health and find proper spine alignment so that you can sit comfortably for years to come.  

Note: The prices above reflect the listed retailer's price on the date this article was published.