Now playing
04:00
How a cake dispute reached the Supreme Court
WASHINGTON - FEBRUARY 05:  The U.S. Supreme Court is shown February 5, 2009 in Washington, DC. It was announced today that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had surgery after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Win McNamee/Getty Images
WASHINGTON - FEBRUARY 05: The U.S. Supreme Court is shown February 5, 2009 in Washington, DC. It was announced today that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had surgery after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:32
SCOTUS: States can force tax on online shoppers
Jack Phillips Today Show
NBC
Jack Phillips Today Show
Now playing
02:18
Colorado baker: I couldn't create this cake
A wedding cake with statuettes of two men is seen during the demonstration in West Hollywood, California, May 15, 2008, after the decision by the California Supreme Court to effectively greenlight same-sex marriage. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
A wedding cake with statuettes of two men is seen during the demonstration in West Hollywood, California, May 15, 2008, after the decision by the California Supreme Court to effectively greenlight same-sex marriage. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:04
SCOTUS rules for baker in same-sex cake case
People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court, on April 23, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court, on April 23, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:44
SCOTUS wipes away lower court ruling
how the supreme court picks cases_00000000.jpg
how the supreme court picks cases_00000000.jpg
Now playing
01:39
How the Supreme Court picks its cases
Now playing
01:31
Supreme Court allows parts of travel ban
WASHINGTON - JUNE 25: The exterior view of the U.S. Supreme Court is seen June 25, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court has ruled to give more freedom for interest groups and unions to run TV ads before elections, and also ruled to limit taxpayers' rights to challenge government initiatives as unconstitutionally promoting religion. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
File/Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON - JUNE 25: The exterior view of the U.S. Supreme Court is seen June 25, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court has ruled to give more freedom for interest groups and unions to run TV ads before elections, and also ruled to limit taxpayers' rights to challenge government initiatives as unconstitutionally promoting religion. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:05
Supreme Court throws out NC redistricting maps
Pro-choice activist, Alissa Manzoeillo, of Washington, D.C. waits for rulings in front of the U.S. Supreme Court  on June 27, 2016 in Washington, DC. A ruling is expected in Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, a Texas case the places restrictions on abortion clinics, as well as rulings in the former Virginia Governor's corruption case and a gun rights case.
Pete Marovich/Getty Images
Pro-choice activist, Alissa Manzoeillo, of Washington, D.C. waits for rulings in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016 in Washington, DC. A ruling is expected in Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt, a Texas case the places restrictions on abortion clinics, as well as rulings in the former Virginia Governor's corruption case and a gun rights case.
Now playing
01:25
Supreme Court rules on Texas abortion law
Obama Supreme Court immigration ruling_00000000.jpg
Obama Supreme Court immigration ruling_00000000.jpg
Now playing
01:16
Obama responds to immigration ruling
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown as the court meets to issue decisions May 23, 2016 in Washington, D.C.
Win McNamee/Getty Images
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown as the court meets to issue decisions May 23, 2016 in Washington, D.C.
Now playing
01:11
Supreme Court upholds affirmative action at university
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 25: A gay marriage waves a flag in front of the Supreme Court Building June 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court is expected rule in the next few days on whether states can prohibit same sex marriage, as 13 states currently do. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 25: A gay marriage waves a flag in front of the Supreme Court Building June 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court is expected rule in the next few days on whether states can prohibit same sex marriage, as 13 states currently do. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:36
GOP hopefuls denounce marriage ruling
The Justices of the US Supreme Court sit for their official photograph on October 8, 2010 at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. Front row (L-R): Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Back Row (L-R): Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. and Associate Justice Elena Kagan. AFP PHOTO / TIM SLOAN (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)
TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images
The Justices of the US Supreme Court sit for their official photograph on October 8, 2010 at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. Front row (L-R): Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Back Row (L-R): Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. and Associate Justice Elena Kagan. AFP PHOTO / TIM SLOAN (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:21
Supreme Court rules on EPA emissions limits
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown March 29, 2016 in Washington, DC following the first 4-4 tie in a case before the court.
Win McNamee/Getty Images
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown March 29, 2016 in Washington, DC following the first 4-4 tie in a case before the court.
Now playing
01:09
Supreme Court rules 7-1 in favor of death row inmate
A general view of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)Supreme Court building exterior
JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images
A general view of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)Supreme Court building exterior
Now playing
01:37
Supreme Court rules in favor of lethal injection drug
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 26: The exterior of the U.S. Supreme Court on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 26: The exterior of the U.S. Supreme Court on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:14
Supreme Court rules on congressional districting

Editor’s Note: Gavin Grimm is the plaintiff in G.G. v. Gloucester County School Board, a case challenging his Virginia high school’s bathroom ban. The views expressed in this commentary are his own.

(CNN) —  

Over the past few years I’ve learned what it means to fight for my right to be treated just like everyone else. When my high school implemented a bathroom ban that forbade me from using the men’s bathroom even though I am a transgender male student, I fought back. My fight took me to the US Supreme Court and still continues today – despite the Court sending my case back to the district court.

I am not alone in this fight. There are people in every community who are standing up for the basic rights that everyone – regardless of orientation or creed – should be able to enjoy.

Gavin Grimm
ACLU // Scout Tufankjian
Gavin Grimm

Two of these people are about to have their case heard by the United States Supreme Court, and the decision could impact the rights of countless LGBTQ Americans. On Tuesday, Charlie Craig and Dave Mullins will stand before the US Supreme Court because a local bakery in their Colorado community discriminated against them on the basis of their sexual orientation. The business refused to sell them the same product that it would have sold a heterosexual couple – a wedding cake. The bakery is arguing that it has a constitutional right to refuse to bake such a cake if it violates the baker’s religious beliefs.

Their case, dubbed Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, shouldn’t fool anyone. It has nothing to do with cake, and everything to do with civil rights.

Charlie and Dave were refused service by the business five years ago, so it’s certainly been a long road for them. I suspect that, like me, they worry every time they enter a public place that they will face discrimination on the basis of who they are.

While my own experience didn’t involve a public business, it was based on the same discriminatory principle: Not treating members of the LGBT community as equals.

Just as Charlie and Dave want people to understand their case isn’t about where they can buy a cake, my case was about more than just a restroom. It was about whether LGBT people have the freedom to exist and live in public life.

Discrimination is not new. Many have felt the pains of its humiliation for centuries before us. Many still know the overwhelming feeling of anxiousness and fear, the uncertainty of whether or not they are able to do something as simple as purchase a baked good or use a restroom without coming under fire.

Put yourself in Charlie and Dave’s shoes, or the shoes of Charlie’s mother Debbie, who was with them when the business owner said he would not serve them. Can you imagine the humiliation she must have felt watching her son go through that experience?

The bakery is arguing for the right to say “only heterosexuals served here.” If they prevail, other businesses could argue they can display signs saying “no transgender people served here,” or any other discriminatory message that conveys the sentiment – “your kind is not welcome.”

Forty-five states and the federal government have laws to protect against discrimination on the basis of race, religion, gender, and national origin. Twenty-one of those states and the District of Columbia, and some federal government agencies, also include sexual orientation in those protections – including Colorado.

Charlie and Dave are heading to the Supreme Court to ensure that discrimination is not written into the Constitution.

Get our free weekly newsletter

Of course, this case could have consequences for more than just LGBT people. It could impact countless Americans, including women, racial minorities, religious minorities, unwed parents, interracial couples, and so many others. Could a public business owner refuse service to an unwed mother, citing their religious beliefs? Could they deny an interracial couple the same service? The examples go on and on, but the point is, no one should be denied the same service offered to everyone else at a public business because of who they are.

As millions of Americans stood with me during my march to the Supreme Court, I will now stand with Charlie and Dave. No one, including businesses, should have a constitutional right to discriminate against anyone. Businesses that are open to the public should be open to all.