Arts

'A Forest Where Gods Live': latest show by Japanese art collective teamLab

Updated 2:49 AM ET, Fri January 26, 2018
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"A Forest Where Gods Live" (2017) by teamLab was set in a large, beautiful park in Kyushu, southern Japan. teamLab
The digital art exhibition used lights, projections, sensors and sound to turn nature into a work of art. The concept of the project was to turn nature into art without harming it -- the digital techniques left no physical mark. teamLab
Thousands of azalea bushes lit up to greet visitors. teamLab
The natural world became a canvas. teamLab
Flowers were projected onto a large rock faces. teamLab
In a digital projection, flowers would grow, bud and bloom, and then wither and die in an endless cycle. teamLab
Projections on this large, moss-covered rock, continually changed, displaying flowers from different seasons. teamLab
This large sacred rock encloses the Inari Daimyojin shrine. teamLab
A spectacular, digital waterfall cascades down the rock. KeiSugimoto
Shimmering lights and fish were projected onto the surface of Mifuneyama Rakuen Pond. teamLab
Responding to sensors, digital koi interacted with a small boat that floated in the pond. Kei,Sugimoto
The koi scattered away from the boat as it moved. teamLab
Tiny lights illuminated the branches of the trees. KeiSugimoto
The leaves of cherry blossom trees and maple trees were accented by colorful lights. KeiSugimoto
Each tree's light was autonomous, glowing brightly and then fading. teamLab
The color of the light on trees would change as visitors passed by. KeiSugimoto
Lights on one tree would trigger the lights on neighboring trees, spreading color. KeiSugimoto
Drawing on the long tradition of Japanese calligraphy, the collective projected a circle onto a large rock, split by the roots of a maple tree. Plumes of inky smoke appeared to puff into the air. teamLab
At the WASO Teahouse, flowers bloomed in the tea. teamLab
As long as there is tea in the cup, flowers would continue to appear and bloom. When the tea was gone, the artwork disappeared. KeiSugimoto