CNN
Now playing
02:25
Man stole truck to drive victims to hospital
Chelsea Romo lost an eye when she was shot during the Las Vegas massacre.
Mallory Simon/CNN
Chelsea Romo lost an eye when she was shot during the Las Vegas massacre.
Now playing
03:10
FL shooting revives Vegas survivors' trauma
las vegas shooting victims recovery orig nws vstan_00030515.jpg
las vegas shooting victims recovery orig nws vstan_00030515.jpg
Now playing
04:17
She'll carry these scars with her forever
CNN
Now playing
02:35
Husband gets Thanksgiving Day surprise
Now playing
02:35
Woman shot in head in Las Vegas now walking
las vegas shooting victim tonks family pkg sidner _00002804.jpg
las vegas shooting victim tonks family pkg sidner _00002804.jpg
Now playing
02:59
Family mourns single mother killed in attack
Now playing
02:42
Victim's husband: It's still not real to me
Now playing
02:50
Shooting survivor: My friend died in my arms
las vegas shooting victim life support tuchman pkg ac_00022412.jpg
las vegas shooting victim life support tuchman pkg ac_00022412.jpg
Now playing
02:24
Las Vegas shooting victim fighting to survive
CNN
Now playing
01:43
Las Vegas survivor recounts moment he was shot
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: Mourners light candles during a vigil at the corner of Sahara Avenue and Las Vegas Boulevard  for the victims of Sunday night's mass shooting, October 2, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Late Sunday night, a lone gunman killed more than 50 people and injured more than 500 people after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, a three-day country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Drew Angerer/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: Mourners light candles during a vigil at the corner of Sahara Avenue and Las Vegas Boulevard for the victims of Sunday night's mass shooting, October 2, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Late Sunday night, a lone gunman killed more than 50 people and injured more than 500 people after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, a three-day country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:44
People remember loved ones killed in shooting
CNN
Now playing
01:23
Las Vegas survivor: How can someone be so evil?
two girls talk las vegas shooting nr intv sot baldwin _00014920.jpg
two girls talk las vegas shooting nr intv sot baldwin _00014920.jpg
Now playing
02:09
Las Vegas witnesses recall harrowing escape
Now playing
02:00
Survivor held stranger's hand as he died
Freezer hiding Las Vegas
Bryan Hopkins
Freezer hiding Las Vegas
Now playing
02:18
These concertgoers hid in a freezer
survivor as vegas emotional newday
CNN
survivor as vegas emotional newday
Now playing
02:18
Las Vegas survivor: Why do I get to live?
(CNN) —  

When a gunman started firing into a crowd of concertgoers in Las Vegas on Sunday night, Iraq war veteran Taylor Winston thought on his feet.

Bullets were flying. People were injured. Winston saw a truck with the keys still inside in a lot near the venue, and didn’t hesitate to jump into action, he told CNN’s Anderson Cooper Tuesday.

“Once we were in it, we decided to go help get everyone out of there,” he said. “Shots were still firing, we had a couple of friends … set up a make shift hospital on the backside away from the gunfire, and they were pulling people out of the venue. We pulled up to that and they started loading us up with the most critical injured.”

By the end of the night, at least 58 people were killed and more than 500 were injured, making it the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history.

“It was still quite scary, but we just knew they had to get to the hospital immediately,” Winston said. “No ambulances were immediately available. There was far too many causalities for anyone to handle. Probably one of the hardest parts was leaving everyone behind that I couldn’t fit in who were still critical injured.”

Winston recounted making two trips from the festival grounds to the hospital.

“We took them first round and dropped them off,” he said. “We had help at the hospital to get them all out and get them into the hospital and once we were clear we just said ‘let’s go back for me.’ We went back for a second trip and filled it to the brim of essentially bodies, some barely breathing, and had people applying pressure and trying to help them survive to make it to the hospital.”

Cooper asked Winston about how his military training helped him through such a horrific ordeal.

“I think a lot of my training helped in the event, helped me keep a cool head,” Winston said. “But at the end of the day, we just knew we had a mission to get as many people to safety.”