Mexico pulls Texas aid offer as it grapples with earthquake

Updated 9:56 AM EDT, Tue September 12, 2017
Reuters/@ILS_GP
Now playing
01:01
Earthquake shakes buildings in Mexico
mexico earthquake rescues lc orig_00003023.jpg
mexico earthquake rescues lc orig_00003023.jpg
Now playing
01:13
Silence falls as crowds listen for signs of life
Martin Mendez
Now playing
03:33
Earthquake survivors describe the moment it hit
FORO TV
Now playing
01:15
Witness: Quake one of the strongest I've felt
nepal drone footage earthquake disaster relief orig_00011504.jpg
nepal drone footage earthquake disaster relief orig_00011504.jpg
Now playing
01:35
5 things you should know about earthquakes
weather 15 years of earthquakes jj nccorig_00004316.jpg
NOAA
weather 15 years of earthquakes jj nccorig_00004316.jpg
Now playing
00:47
See 15 years of earthquakes in 45 seconds
earthquake early warning system orig mg_00002310.jpg
earthquake early warning system orig mg_00002310.jpg
Now playing
01:38
Why aren't earthquake warnings better?

Story highlights

Mexico announces it won't be sending aid to Texas due to two natural disasters

CNN —  

Mexico will no longer send the emergency aid offered to Texas after Hurricane Harvey, to focus on those affected by a deadly earthquake and Hurricane Katia that struck the eastern state of Veracruz last week, the Mexican Foreign Ministry said Monday.

In a statement, the ministry said the decision was taken in light of the changed circumstances in both countries, and the fact that the need for help in Texas had diminished.

Mexico offered to deliver aid to Texas in late August, after the state was struck by Hurricane Harvey and flooding. But Mexico is now grappling with the aftermath of two natural disasters.

An 8.1-magnitude earthquake struck off Mexico’s southern coast last Thursday. The earthquake struck the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Tabasco, and killed 95 people, according to the Foreign Ministry.

It was the most powerful to hit the country in a century and was felt as far as Mexico City and Guatemala City by an estimated 50 million people.

The following day, Hurricane Katia, a Category 1 storm, made landfall in Mexico’s state of Veracruz. Katia’s remnants led to a mudslide that killed two people Saturday in the city of Xalapa, Veracruz Gov. Miguel Angel Yunes had said.

“Given this situation, the Mexican government will channel all available logistical support to the families and communities that have been affected in Mexico and has informed the Texas and US governments that, unfortunately, on this occasion, it won’t be possible to provide the assistance originally offered to Texas in late August in the wake of Hurricane Harvey,” according to the Foreign Ministry’s statement.

Mexico had offered to send 25 trailers with supplies, as well as 300 beds, nine generators, water treatment equipment, three mobile kitchens, radio and satellite equipment and personnel to the US.

Mexican government officials had initially announced their offer in a statement responding to President Donald Trump’s tweets bashing Mexico for violence and the trade deal between the countries. The hurricane aid was offered “as good neighbors should always do in difficult times.”

CNN’s Lonzo Cook and Leyla Santiago contributed to this report.