A man carries personal items through a flooded street caused by remnants of Hurricane Matthew on October 11, 2016 in Fair Bluff, North Carolina. Thousands of homes have been damaged in North Carolina as a result of the storm and many are still under threat of flooding.
Sean Rayford/Getty Images
A man carries personal items through a flooded street caused by remnants of Hurricane Matthew on October 11, 2016 in Fair Bluff, North Carolina. Thousands of homes have been damaged in North Carolina as a result of the storm and many are still under threat of flooding.
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Storm chasing photographers take photos underneath a rotating supercell storm system in Maxwell, Nebraska on September 3, 2016. Although multiple tornado warnings were issued throughout the area, no funnel cloud touched down. / AFP / Josh Edelson / XGTY
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE  / MANDATORY CREDIT:  "AFP PHOTO / Josh EDELSON" / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS /  DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  ==        (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
JOSH EDELSON/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Storm chasing photographers take photos underneath a rotating supercell storm system in Maxwell, Nebraska on September 3, 2016. Although multiple tornado warnings were issued throughout the area, no funnel cloud touched down. / AFP / Josh Edelson / XGTY RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / Josh EDELSON" / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS == (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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TOPSHOT - A city worker drives through the flooded street during Hurricane Sally in downtown Pensacola, Florida on September 16, 2020. - Hurricane Sally barrelled into the US Gulf Coast early Wednesday, with forecasts of drenching rains that could provoke "historic" and potentially deadly flash floods.The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said the Category 2 storm hit Gulf Shores, Alabama at about 4:45 am (0945 GMT), bringing maximum sustained winds of about 105 miles (165 kilometers) per hour."Historic life-threatening flooding likely along portions of the northern Gulf coast," the Miami-based center had warned late Tuesday, adding the hurricane could dump up to 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain in some areas. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
TOPSHOT - A city worker drives through the flooded street during Hurricane Sally in downtown Pensacola, Florida on September 16, 2020. - Hurricane Sally barrelled into the US Gulf Coast early Wednesday, with forecasts of drenching rains that could provoke "historic" and potentially deadly flash floods.The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said the Category 2 storm hit Gulf Shores, Alabama at about 4:45 am (0945 GMT), bringing maximum sustained winds of about 105 miles (165 kilometers) per hour."Historic life-threatening flooding likely along portions of the northern Gulf coast," the Miami-based center had warned late Tuesday, adding the hurricane could dump up to 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain in some areas. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
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(CNN) —  

Hurricane Jose strengthened to an “extremely dangerous” Category 4 storm Friday, with maximum sustained winds of 155 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The storm was about 265 miles east-southeast of the Northern Leeward Islands at 8 p.m. ET Friday, moving west-northwest at 14 mph, the hurricane center said.

The coast isn’t exactly clear yet.

The eye of Irma passed over Barbuda, a tiny Caribbean island of about 1,800 residents, on Wednesday, destroying telecommunication systems and cell towers. The storm damaged about 95% of the buildings on the island, Prime Minister Gaston Browne said.

Satellite imagery shows Category 4 Hurricane Irma approach the Bahamas, followed by Hurricane Jose approaching the Leeward Islands. Hurricane Katia spins in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.
NASA/NOAA
Satellite imagery shows Category 4 Hurricane Irma approach the Bahamas, followed by Hurricane Jose approaching the Leeward Islands. Hurricane Katia spins in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.

Before Jose’s slight weakening, the Atlantic had two hurricanes with winds of more than 150 mph at the same time for the first time on record, Colorado State University meteorologist Philip Klotzbach said Friday.

A third storm, Katia, made landfall late Friday north of Tecolutla, Mexico, as a Category 1 hurricane but had weakened to a tropical depression by Saturday morning, the hurricane center said. It was to break up over eastern Mexico, with heavy rains still expected.

In addition, Hurricane Katia in the Gulf of Mexico made landfall in Mexico late Friday with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph and, the National Hurricane Center said.