Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge attends the 2017 Portrait Gala, at the National Portrait Gallery in London on March 28, 2017.
The 2017 Gala is fundraising for Coming Home, a project that will make it possible for portraits of iconic individuals to return to places that are special to them for a loan period of over three years. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / NEIL HALL        (Photo credit should read NEIL HALL/AFP/Getty Images)
NEIL HALL/AFP/Getty Images
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge attends the 2017 Portrait Gala, at the National Portrait Gallery in London on March 28, 2017. The 2017 Gala is fundraising for Coming Home, a project that will make it possible for portraits of iconic individuals to return to places that are special to them for a loan period of over three years. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / NEIL HALL (Photo credit should read NEIL HALL/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:39
The Duchess of Cambridge's best moments
Now playing
03:44
Do the 1990s hold the key to sustainable websites?
Now playing
01:10
Watch SpaceX land its Mars rocket prototype for the first time
Now playing
05:52
The climate crisis is taking these farmers' most valuable resource
U.S. President Donald Trump works on his phone during a roundtable at the State Dining Room of the White House June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump held a roundtable discussion with Governors and small business owners on the reopening of American's small business. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump works on his phone during a roundtable at the State Dining Room of the White House June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump held a roundtable discussion with Governors and small business owners on the reopening of American's small business. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:37
Facebook Oversight Board: Indefinite suspension of Trump's account is 'not appropriate'
Now playing
03:41
How technology at NASA helps guide Biden on climate
Now playing
01:42
A vaccine without needles? It's on the way
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - FEBRUARY 06:  Host Conan O'Brien speaks onstage during the 5th Annual NFL Honors at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium on February 6, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)
Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - FEBRUARY 06: Host Conan O'Brien speaks onstage during the 5th Annual NFL Honors at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium on February 6, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:48
Conan announces his last show after 30 years in late night
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Now playing
03:14
Will Trump be allowed back on Facebook? This board will decide
CNN
Now playing
05:16
WTF is a SPAC?
Now playing
01:51
A shortage of tanker truck drivers could cause stations to run out of gas
CEO at Verizon Media K. Guru Gowrappan appears at the 2019 Verizon Media NewFront on April 30, 2019 in New York City.
Noam Galai/Getty Images for Verizon Media
CEO at Verizon Media K. Guru Gowrappan appears at the 2019 Verizon Media NewFront on April 30, 2019 in New York City.
Now playing
02:47
Verizon sells off Yahoo and AOL
Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, attends the 2019 annual shareholders meeting in Omaha, Nebraska, May 3, 2019. (Photo by Johannes EISELE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images)
Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images
Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, attends the 2019 annual shareholders meeting in Omaha, Nebraska, May 3, 2019. (Photo by Johannes EISELE / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:40
Warren Buffett warns on US inflation
Now playing
01:00
Astronauts splash down after record-setting mission
ATLANTA - APRIL 30:  A Boeing 757 with a new Delta Airlines logo sits on the tarmac following the company's emergence from bankruptcy at Hartsfield Jackson International Airport April 30,2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. The 757 sports new branding that will appear on more than 900 planes, at airports and on advertising.  (Photo by Barry Williams/Getty Images) 757
Barry Williams/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
ATLANTA - APRIL 30: A Boeing 757 with a new Delta Airlines logo sits on the tarmac following the company's emergence from bankruptcy at Hartsfield Jackson International Airport April 30,2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. The 757 sports new branding that will appear on more than 900 planes, at airports and on advertising. (Photo by Barry Williams/Getty Images) 757
Now playing
02:28
Why Delta airlines is resuming selling middle seats
Now playing
02:50
Grocery chain says 'hero pay' forcing them to close stores
(CNN) —  

Photographs of Britain’s Duchess of Cambridge sunbathing topless on vacation in 2012 were an invasion of privacy, a French court ruled on Tuesday.

The court in Nanterre, in the western suburbs of Paris, awarded 100,000 euros in damages to the duchess and her husband, Prince William. It also slapped both the editor of Closer magazine and the chief executive of the publishing group that owns it with the maximum fine possible under French law (45,000 euros or about $53,500).

The couple had asked for 1.5 million euros (nearly $1.8 million) in damages after the magazine and regional newspaper La Provence published grainy photos that showed the duchess sunbathing topless while on holiday in the south of France.

The photos were taken with long lenses as the duke and duchess stayed at a private chateau owned by Viscount Linley, a nephew of Queen Elizabeth.

William and his wife were on a nine-day tour of Southeast Asia, seen here arriving in Tuvalu in 2012, when the paparazzi pictures where published.
AFP/Getty Images
William and his wife were on a nine-day tour of Southeast Asia, seen here arriving in Tuvalu in 2012, when the paparazzi pictures where published.

Paul-Albert Inweis, the main lawyer for Closer, called the fines “somewhat exaggerated” after the ruling.

“The Windsor spouses sought 1.5 million euros in damages from the court but they got 50,000 each, which is in line with the jurisprudence. This is welcome,” he said. “On the other hand, the fine – which corresponds to the maximum fine – seems somewhat exaggerated for a private dispute.”

“This case raises real issues regarding freedom and we will consult with our clients.”

Six people associated with the publication of the paparazzi images – including three photographers – went on trial in May, five years after they were first printed.

At the time, Prince William slammed the decision to print the images of his wife as “particularly shocking” in light of his late mother’s battles with the paparazzi.

Princess Diana died 20 years ago in a car accident as she fled photographers in Paris, when her sons were aged 15 and 12.

“The incident is reminiscent of the worst excesses of the press and paparazzi during the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, and all the more upsetting to The Duke and Duchess for being so,” a palace spokesman said in 2012.

In 2012, Closer was fined by a French court for printing the images and banned from distributing the print magazine and online. The court also ordered the publication to turn over the original images to the royal family within 24 hours of the ruling and pay them 2,000 euros (around $2,600).

The ruling comes a day after the duke and duchess announced they are expecting their third child together. The baby will be fifth in line to the throne.