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People fly into the air as a vehicle drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The nationalists were holding the rally to protest plans by the city of Charlottesville to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. There were several hundred protesters marching in a long line when the car drove into a group of them. (Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP)
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People fly into the air as a vehicle drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The nationalists were holding the rally to protest plans by the city of Charlottesville to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. There were several hundred protesters marching in a long line when the car drove into a group of them. (Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP)
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BERLIN, GERMANY - MAY 25: Former President of the United States of America Barack Obama after a discussion about democracy at Church Congress on May 25, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. Up to 200,000 faithful are expected to attend the five-day congress in Berlin and Wittenberg that this year is celebrating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. (Photo by Steffi Loos/Getty Images)
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People fly into the air as a vehicle drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The nationalists were holding the rally to protest plans by the city of Charlottesville to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. There were several hundred protesters marching in a long line when the car drove into a group of them. (Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP)
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People fly into the air as a vehicle drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The nationalists were holding the rally to protest plans by the city of Charlottesville to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. There were several hundred protesters marching in a long line when the car drove into a group of them. (Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP)
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CNN —  

Here’s what you need to know about President Donald Trump’s wild news conference Tuesday: It drew the immediate praise of David Duke.

The President’s abrupt and belligerent about-face Tuesday, in which he lashed out at the media for mischaracterizing white supremacist protesters in Charlottesville, drew the swift condemnation of a number of lawmakers, including Republicans, and shocked the people who witnessed them.

But one person who was very happy with the words of the US President was the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke, who just as quickly reacted on Twitter, thanking the President “for your honesty and courage.”

“Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville & condemn the leftist terrorists in BLM/Antifa,” was the full tweet from an account that is not verified by Twitter but appears to represent Duke and features videos apparently posted by and of him.

Trump used language familiar to the “alt-right” and white supremacists when he bemoaned “changing culture” that would results from the tearing down of statues honoring confederate generals like Robert E. Lee, who Trump equated with founding fathers like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who were slave owners.

Trump condemned the white supremacists and neo-Nazis, but he defended as “very fine people” some of the marchers who marched alongside them.

Trump was also asked Tuesday specifically about Duke, who took part in the Charlottesville march.

“I didn’t know David Duke was there,” Trump said, before arguing he was slow to react to the racists at the march because he wanted to get all the facts.

00:47 - Source: CNN
Former KKK leader invokes Trump's name

Trump drew criticism for refusing to condemn Duke during a contentious interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper in February 2016.

He later argued a faulty earpiece had made him not understand the question. Watch that exchange here:

09:16 - Source: CNN
Trump refuses to disavow white supremacist David Duke

Correction: This story misquoted Trump. He said some of the people marching along the white nationalists were “very fine,” not “good.”