US President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up after speaking during a Mother's Day event hosted by First Lady Melania Trump for military spouses in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, May 12, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB
SAUL LOEB/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up after speaking during a Mother's Day event hosted by First Lady Melania Trump for military spouses in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, May 12, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB
Now playing
01:06
New poll: Trump's approval rating slide
Now playing
03:44
Do the 1990s hold the key to sustainable websites?
Now playing
01:10
Watch SpaceX land its Mars rocket prototype for the first time
Now playing
05:52
The climate crisis is taking these farmers' most valuable resource
U.S. President Donald Trump works on his phone during a roundtable at the State Dining Room of the White House June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump held a roundtable discussion with Governors and small business owners on the reopening of American's small business. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump works on his phone during a roundtable at the State Dining Room of the White House June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump held a roundtable discussion with Governors and small business owners on the reopening of American's small business. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:37
Facebook Oversight Board: Indefinite suspension of Trump's account is 'not appropriate'
Now playing
03:41
How technology at NASA helps guide Biden on climate
Now playing
01:42
A vaccine without needles? It's on the way
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - FEBRUARY 06:  Host Conan O'Brien speaks onstage during the 5th Annual NFL Honors at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium on February 6, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)
Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - FEBRUARY 06: Host Conan O'Brien speaks onstage during the 5th Annual NFL Honors at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium on February 6, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:48
Conan announces his last show after 30 years in late night
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Now playing
03:14
Will Trump be allowed back on Facebook? This board will decide
CNN
Now playing
05:16
WTF is a SPAC?
Now playing
01:51
A shortage of tanker truck drivers could cause stations to run out of gas
CEO at Verizon Media K. Guru Gowrappan appears at the 2019 Verizon Media NewFront on April 30, 2019 in New York City.
Noam Galai/Getty Images for Verizon Media
CEO at Verizon Media K. Guru Gowrappan appears at the 2019 Verizon Media NewFront on April 30, 2019 in New York City.
Now playing
02:47
Verizon sells off Yahoo and AOL
Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, attends the 2019 annual shareholders meeting in Omaha, Nebraska, May 3, 2019. (Photo by Johannes EISELE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images)
Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images
Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, attends the 2019 annual shareholders meeting in Omaha, Nebraska, May 3, 2019. (Photo by Johannes EISELE / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:40
Warren Buffett warns on US inflation
Now playing
01:00
Astronauts splash down after record-setting mission
ATLANTA - APRIL 30:  A Boeing 757 with a new Delta Airlines logo sits on the tarmac following the company's emergence from bankruptcy at Hartsfield Jackson International Airport April 30,2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. The 757 sports new branding that will appear on more than 900 planes, at airports and on advertising.  (Photo by Barry Williams/Getty Images) 757
Barry Williams/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
ATLANTA - APRIL 30: A Boeing 757 with a new Delta Airlines logo sits on the tarmac following the company's emergence from bankruptcy at Hartsfield Jackson International Airport April 30,2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. The 757 sports new branding that will appear on more than 900 planes, at airports and on advertising. (Photo by Barry Williams/Getty Images) 757
Now playing
02:28
Why Delta airlines is resuming selling middle seats
Now playing
02:50
Grocery chain says 'hero pay' forcing them to close stores
(CNN) —  

The numbers in the new CNN poll are striking: six in 10 people don’t believe President Trump is “honest and trustworthy.”

For any normal president, those numbers – especially this early in his time in office – would be cause for total and complete panic.

For Trump, they’re just more of the same.

Go back to the 2016 exit polls. Just 33% of voters said Trump was honest and trustworthy while 64% said he was not. And he won!

How? Because Hillary Clinton’s numbers on the “honest and trustworthy” question – 36% said she was/61% said she was not – weren’t much better. In fact, one in five voters who said that Trump was neither honest nor trustworthy voted for him! Of the three in 10 voters who said neither candidate was honest, Trump beat Clinton 43% to 40%.

The lesson to be learned from the 2016 election is that enough voters simply didn’t care that Trump didn’t tell the truth a lot of the time. And, he really didn’t. As of November 3, 2016, 64% of all the Trump statements the Washington Post’s Fact Checker had, um, checked were found to be totally and completely false. (The average politician makes completely false statements 10-20% of the time, according to the Fact Checker.)

Some – Trump’s base – believed that he was telling the truth in spite of all of those numbers. That if the media said he was lying, he must be telling the truth.

But there were also a large number of Trump voters who knew he was lying and misleading at a record rate and just didn’t care. Or, to put a finer point on it: They didn’t care about Trump’s lies as much as they cared about throwing out the status quo and electing someone they thought would be a change agent.

Again, the exit polling is telling. Of the four in 10 voters who said the most important thing to them was a candidate who could bring change to Washington, Trump took 82% to 14% for Clinton. That’s the election, in one question.

In other words: It was always a relatively small faction of Trump voters who chose him because they believed he was a truth-teller. Most Trump voters made peace with the fact he often exaggerated and straight-out lied because, well, all politicians lie. And at least Trump was brazen about it.

Since being elected president, Trump has not slowed the pace of his misstatements and lies. According, again, to the Post’s Fact Checker, Trump made 836 false or misleading claims in his first six months as President, a pace of almost five a day(!). These misstatements and lies range from the big – that President Obama ordered a wiretap of Trump Tower during the 2016 campaign – to the much more mundane, like making up phone calls with people.

And yet, Trump’s numbers on being honest and trustworthy are basically the same as they have always been: Bad but with no obvious downward plunge.

What that suggests to me is that drawing conclusions about Trump’s political future based on how few people trust him may miss the mark.

A better potential measure? How people view his management of the country. After all, the basic conceit of Trump’s campaign was that the people running the government were dumb and bad. And that he was smart and good. Elect him President and he would, to borrow a phrase, make America great again.

In November 2016, a week after the election, 50% of people said they believed Trump could “manage the government effectively.” In the new CNN poll. just 36% say he is an effective manager.

That number is where Trump’s real political peril, ahem, lies.