Turns out we may all be made of stardust, scientists say

Updated 11:41 AM EDT, Thu July 27, 2017
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(CNN) —  

If you were looking to space for extra-terrestrial life, maybe it’s time to look in the mirror. A new study claims we might all be part-alien.

Supercomputer simulations conducted by a team of astrophysicists at Northwestern University suggest that each of us – and everything in our galaxy – may have been expelled vast distances across the universe by exploding supernovas.

Thrown into space with such force, streams of charged atoms are blasted away from their original galaxy’s gravitational pull and carried to our Milky Way on “powerful galactic winds.”

Daniel Angles-Alcazar, a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern in Illinois who led the study, told CNN that the team created intricate 3-D models which allowed the team to explore the evolution of galaxies over time.

“We ran highly sophisticated simulations, looking at the formation of galaxies from shortly after the Big Bang and traced their development to today,” Angles-Alcazar said, continuing “We found that when we completed these simulations that we could saythat the atoms which formed the solar system and so which form us, may have existed in other galaxies.”