CNN
Now playing
01:20
Trump on terrorism: We're going to end it
President Donald Trump addresses the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
Richard Drew/AP
President Donald Trump addresses the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
Now playing
02:17
Trump claim to world leaders met with laughter
Trump laughing with me
CNN
Trump laughing with me
Now playing
01:38
Trump: World leaders were laughing with me
CNN Illustration/Getty Images
Now playing
01:59
Trump warns about doing business with Iran
President Donald Trump talks on the phone aboard Air Force One during a flight to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to address a joint gathering of House and Senate Republicans, Thursday, January 26, 2017. This was the Presidentâs first Trip aboard Air Force One. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)
Shealah Craighead/White House Photo/Getty Images
President Donald Trump talks on the phone aboard Air Force One during a flight to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to address a joint gathering of House and Senate Republicans, Thursday, January 26, 2017. This was the Presidentâs first Trip aboard Air Force One. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)
Now playing
01:36
WH stops summarizing calls with world leaders
CNN
Now playing
01:32
Clarke: Trump diminishes US role and influence
US President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin attend a joint press conference after a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, on July 16, 2018. (Photo by Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP)        (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin attend a joint press conference after a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, on July 16, 2018. (Photo by Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:59
Trump: We are all to blame for Russia relations
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - FEBRUARY 08:  Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on before speaking to members of the media during a visit to AppDirect on February 8, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Trudeau is visiting several cities in the U.S.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - FEBRUARY 08: Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on before speaking to members of the media during a visit to AppDirect on February 8, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Trudeau is visiting several cities in the U.S. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:57
WaPo: Trump admits he gave Trudeau false info
US President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron hold a joint press conference at the White House in Washington, DC, on April 24, 2018. (Photo by LUDOVIC MARIN / AFP)        (Photo credit should read LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images)
LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron hold a joint press conference at the White House in Washington, DC, on April 24, 2018. (Photo by LUDOVIC MARIN / AFP) (Photo credit should read LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:44
Trump has 'terrible' phone call with Macron
photo illustration: getty images/shutterstock/cnnmoney
Now playing
01:17
WH confirms Trump, Putin discussed meeting
travel ban trump then and now orig nws_00002328.jpg
travel ban trump then and now orig nws_00002328.jpg
Now playing
01:23
Trump's travel ban then and now
ABC News
Now playing
01:01
Trump touts trust with Kim in TV interview
Kevin Lim/THE STRAITS TIMES
Now playing
02:11
Memorable moments from the Singapore summit
TOPSHOT - A vendor picks up a 100 yuan note above a newspaper featuring a photo of US president-elect Donald Trump, at a news stand in Beijing on November 10, 2016.
The world's second-largest economy is US president-elect Donald Trump's designated bogeyman, threatening it on the campaign trail with tariffs for stealing American jobs, but analysts say US protectionism could create opportunities for Beijing. / AFP / GREG BAKER        (Photo credit should read GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)
GREG BAKER/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOT - A vendor picks up a 100 yuan note above a newspaper featuring a photo of US president-elect Donald Trump, at a news stand in Beijing on November 10, 2016. The world's second-largest economy is US president-elect Donald Trump's designated bogeyman, threatening it on the campaign trail with tariffs for stealing American jobs, but analysts say US protectionism could create opportunities for Beijing. / AFP / GREG BAKER (Photo credit should read GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:48
US trade with China, explained
CNN
Now playing
01:07
Trump announces withdrawal from Iran deal
US President Donald J. Trump delivers his first address to a joint session of Congress from the floor of the House of Representatives in Washington, DC, USA, 28 February 2017.   / AFP / EPA POOL / JIM LO SCALZO        (Photo credit should read JIM LO SCALZO/AFP/Getty Images)
JIM LO SCALZO/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald J. Trump delivers his first address to a joint session of Congress from the floor of the House of Representatives in Washington, DC, USA, 28 February 2017. / AFP / EPA POOL / JIM LO SCALZO (Photo credit should read JIM LO SCALZO/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:46
Trump's foreign policy: One thing to know

Story highlights

Democratic Sens. Chuck Schumer and Ben Cardin are opposing the Saudi arms sale

A vote is expected this week to disapprove of the sale of precision-guided munitions

(CNN) —  

Senate Democratic leaders are joining forces with Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky to oppose a small portion of President Donald Trump’s arms deal with Saudi Arabia.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Monday he was supporting a resolution offered by Paul and Democratic Sens. Chris Murphy of Connecticut and Al Franken of Minnesota to block the sale of $510 million of precision-guided munitions to Saudi Arabia.

Paul and Murphy are expected to force a vote on their resolution – which is possible under Senate rules for arms sales – as early as Tuesday, according to Senate aides.

“I will support Senator Murphy’s resolution of disapproval,” Schumer said in a statement. “The human rights and humanitarian concerns have been well documented and are important: of equal concern to me is that the Saudi government continues to aid and abet terrorism via its relationship with Wahhabism and the funding of schools that spread extremist propaganda throughout the world.”

Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin, the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, came out against the munitions sale to Saudi Arabia last week, citing the Trump administration’s decision to sell weapons to Saudi Arabia instead of trying to find a solution to the civil war in Yemen, where the Saudi-led coalition is accused of bombing civilians.

“I believe it’s important for President Trump to present to us a strategy for how we’re going to end the conflict in Yemen,” Cardin told reporters on Monday.

With the backing of Schumer and Cardin, the vote on the Saudi arms sale could be razor-thin – certainly much closer than the 71-27 vote to dismiss a similar resolution from Paul and Murphy last year.

Both Schumer and Cardin voted to dispose of that disapproval resolution, which was over a separate Saudi arms sale approved under the Obama administration.

But now Senate Democrats appear inclined to oppose the latest arms sale, as they have expressed concerns that the Trump administration is not pressing Saudi Arabia and others on human rights abuses.

Paul and Murphy say they’re objecting to this arms sale because the precision-guided bombs are being used in the Yemeni civil war to target civilians.

“It’s an arms race over there, and we’re fueling it,” Paul told CNN’s Jake Tapper.

Paul told reporters Monday he thought the vote would be “very, very close” when asked about the whip count.

The $510 million munitions sale is part of the $110 billion arms agreement that Trump touted during his visit to Saudi Arabia last month.

The senators are able to object to that portion of the sale because it has been noticed by the State Department, where foreign military sales are subject to a 30-day congressional review period.

Most of the $110 billion Saudi sale has not yet reached that phase. Defense News reported last week that $85 billion of the deal is made up of potential sales that still need to be finalized.

CNN’s Ashley Killough contributed to this report.